Allgemeine Elektrizitäts-Gesellschaft (AEG) Aircraft 1915

AEG C.II

AEG C.II - 1915
AEG C.II

The AEG C.II was a German two-seat biplane reconnaissance aircraft produced in small numbers from October 1915. It was a slightly smaller version of the C.I with better performance, redesigned cockpit for both pilot and observer/bombardier, new rear mounting for a 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 machine gun, and the ability to carry four 10 kg (25 lb) bombs for light attack duties.

AEG C.II
  • Role: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Allgemeine Elektrizitäts-Gesellschaft
  • Entered Service: 1915
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Powerplant: 1 × Benz Bz.III, liquid-cooled inline engine 150 hp (112 kW)
  • Wingspan: 38 ft 10.5 in (11.85 m)
  • Length: 23 ft 3.25 in (7.09 m)
  • Height: 10.40 ft (3.17 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,450 lb(680 kg)
  • Maximum Takeoff Weight: 2,646 lb (1,200 kg)
  • Payload: 90 lb (40 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 138 km/h (86 mph)
  • Range: 360 mi (580 km)
  • Crew: two, pilot and observer
  • Armament:
    • Gun - Observer: 1 × 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 machine gun in observer's cockpit
    • Bombs: Up to 40 kg (90 lb) of bombs

References

  1. MilitaryFactory AEG C.II "http://www.militaryfactory.com/aircraft/detail.asp?aircraft_id=424"
  2. From Wikipedia AEG C.II, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AEG_C.II"

Allgemeine Elektrizitäts-Gesellschaft (AEG) Aircraft 1916

AEG C.IV

AEG C.IV - 1916
AEG C.IV
AEG N.I Night Bomber - 1917
AEG N.I Night Bomber - 1917

The AEG C.IV was a two-seat biplane reconnaissance aircraft produced by Allgemeine Elektrizitats-Gesellschaft (AG). The C.IV was based on the C.II, but featured a larger wingspan and an additional forward-firing LMG 08/15 Spandau-type 0.312 in (7.92 mm) machine gun.

The C.IV was a conventional biplane. The wings featured and equal span upper and lower wing assembly with double bays and parallel struts. The forward portion of the fuselage was contoured , producing a n aerodynamic look while the rest of the body maintained a box-like appearance. Performance was good for the time with the C.IV yielding a top speed of 98 miles per hour with a service ceiling of 16,400 feet.
[Read more]

AEG C.IV
  • Type: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Allgemeine Elektrizitäts-Gesellschaft
  • Entered Service: 1916
  • Number Built: Around 400
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Powerplant: 1× Mercedes D.III water-cooled in-line engine, 160 hp (120 kW)
  • Wingspan: 44 ft 2 in (13.46 m)
  • Wing Area: 420 ft² (39 m²)
  • Length: 23 ft 5.25 in (7.15 m)
  • Height: 11 ft (3.35 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,764 lb (802 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,469 lb (1,120 kg)
  • Maximum Takeoff Weight: 2,469 lb (1,120 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 98 mph (158 km/h)
  • Range: 280 mi (450 km)
  • Service ceiling: 16,400 ft (5,000 m)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Crew: 2, pilot and observer
  • Armament:
    • Gun - Pilot: 1 × forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 "Spandau" machine gun
    • Gun - Observer: 1 × 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 machine gun in ring mount for observer
    • Bombs: up to 220 lb (100 kg)

References

  1. From Wikipedia AEG C.IV, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AEG_C.IV"
  2. The Great War Flying Museum http://www.greatwarflyingmuseum.com/aircraft/germany/aeg_civ.html
  3. Axelrod, Alan. "World War I". Indianapolis: Macmillan USA, Inc, 2000.
  4. Sharpe, Michael (2000). "Biplanes, Triplanes, and Seaplanes". London: Friedman/Fairfax Books. p. 14.
  5. Bullock, David L. Allenby's "War: The Palestine-Arabian Campaigns 1916-18". London: Blandford Press, 1988.
  6. Cron, Hermann. "Imperial German Army 1914-18". Solihull, West Midlands, UK: Helion & Company, 2002.
  7. Flanagan, Brian P.; Smith, Frank; and Raidor, Lonnie. "The Great War 1914-1918 - Chronology of Events of World War I: Cross and Cockade (US)", various volumes and issues covering the period 1916 to 1918. Cross and Cockade (US).
  8. Franks, Norman; Frank Bailey, and Rick Duiven "Casualties of the German Air Service 1914-1920". London: Grub Street, 1999.
  9. Franks, Norman; Frank Bailey, and Russell Guest. "Above the Lines". London: Grub Street, 1998.
  10. Groschel, Dieter H. M, "Ein Verlust der bayerischen Flieger-Abteilung 304 an der Palästina-Front 1918", Das Propellerblatt Nummer 7, 2003.
  11. Groschel, Dieter H. M. and Div Gavish. "Rudolf Holzhausen - Weltkriegsflieger, Dipolmat, und Historiker". Das Propellerblatt Nummer 9, 2004.
  12. Grosz, Peter M. "Windsock Datafile 67 AEG C.IV". Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, UK: Albatros Publications, Ltd., 1998.
  13. Imrie, Alex. "Pictorial History of the German Army Air Service 1914-1918". Chicago: Henry Regnery Company, 1973.
  14. Hoeppner, Ernest, General von. "Germany's War in the Air". Nashville, TN: The Battery Press, 1994.
  15. Nicolle, David. "The Ottoman Army 1914-18", Osprey Men-at-Arms Series No. 269. London, UK: Osprey Publications, Ltd 1994.
  16. Nikolajsen, Ole. "Pilot Fazil Bey Turkish Aviation Hero, Over the Front Volume 22 No. 3". Journal of the League of World War I Aviation Historians, 2007.
  17. Perrett, Bryan. "Megiddo 1918: The Last Great Cavalry Victory", Osprey Campaign Series No. 61. Botley, Oxford, UK: Osprey Publications, Ltd 1999.
  18. Rottgardt, Dirk. "German Armies' Establishment 1914/18", Volume 4: German Forces in the Middle East. West Chester, Ohio: The Nafziger Collection, Inc., 2007.
  19. Sanders, Liman, General von. "Five Years in Turkey". Nashville, TN: The Battery Press, 2000.
  20. Shores, Christopher; Norman Franks, and Russell Guest. "Above the Trenches. A Complete Record of the Fighter Aces and Units of the British Empire Forces 1915-1920". London: Grub Street, 1990.
  21. WWI Aero, volume 107 (for C Types), Dec 1985
  22. Zankl, Reinhard. "Deutsche Flieger-Einheiten 1914-1918": Folge 3 - Flieger-Abteilungen. Das Propellerblatt Nummer 3, 2002.

A.E.G. G-IV

AEG G.IV - 1916
A.E.G. G-IV

The AEG G.IV was a biplane bomber aircraft used in the World War I by Germany. It was developed from the AEG G.III, with refinements to power, bomb-load, and dimensions. Serving late in the war, the AEG G.IV managed to achieve some operational success in reconnaissance and combat roles. Coming into service in late 1916, it featured a bomb capacity twice as large as that of the AEG G.II, but was still considered inadequate in terms of offensive capacity and performance. Further improvements led to the development of the G.V, but the Armistice came before the replacement could become operational.

Because of its relatively short range, the G.IV served mainly as a tactical bomber, and operated close to the front lines. The G.IV flew both day and night operations, but, as the war progressed, was restricted increasingly to night missions. A.E.G. units operated in France, Romania, Greece, and Italy.

The Allgemeine Elektricitäts-Gesellschaft (A.E.G.) G.IV was derived from the earlier G.III. Designed as a tactical bomber, the relatively modern technology included onboard radios and electrically heated suits for the crew. The AEG G.IV also had a quality that endeared it to the men who flew it -it was an extremely rugged aircraft. Unlike the other German bombers such as the Gotha and the Friedrichshafen, the AEG featured an all metal, welded tube frame. Well equipped with armament, although the rear gunner's cockpit was on the top of the fuselage, the position was equipped with a hinged window in the floor for viewing and fending off pursuing aircraft.
[Read more]

A.E.G. G-IV
  • Type: Tactical Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Allgemeine Elektrizitäts Gesellschaft
  • Date: 1917
  • First flight: 1916
  • Introduced: 1916
  • Retired: 1918
  • Engines: 2 × Mercedes D.IVa 6-cylinder water cooled inline engine, 260 hp (194 kW) each
  • Number Built: 320
  • Wing Span: 18.4 m (60 ft 4 in)
  • Wing area: 675 ft² (67 m²)
  • Length: 9.7 m(31 ft 10 in)
  • Height: 3.9 m (12 ft 8 in)
  • Empty Weight: 5,280 lb (2,400 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 7,986 lb (3,630 kg)
  • Max Takeoff Weight: 8,000 lb (3,628 kg)
  • Cruising Speed: 145 km/h (90 mph)
  • Max Speed: 90 kn, 103 mph (166 km/h)
  • Rate of Climb: to 3,280 ft (1000 m): 5 min
  • Service Ceiling: 4,500 m (14,760 ft)
  • Wing Loading: 11.8 lb/ft² (54.2 kg/m²)
  • Power/Mass: 98.6 W/kg (0.0601 hp/lb)
  • Range: 406 nmi, 467 mi (750 km)
  • Endurance: 4-5 hr cruise
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament
    • Guns: 2 × 0.312 in (7.92 mm) machine guns
    • Bombs: 880 lb (400 kg) of bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia AEG G.IV, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AEG_G.IV
  2. Sharpe, Michael. Biplanes, Triplanes, and Seaplanes. London, England: Friedman/Fairfax Books , 2000. Page 15. ISBN 1-58663-300-7.
  3. Grey, Peter and Thetford, Owen. German Aircraft of the First World War. London: Putnam, 1962. ISBN 0-370-00103-6.
  4. Molson, Kenneth M. Canada's National Aviation Museum: Its History and Collections. Ottawa, Canada: National Museum of Science and Technology , 1988. ISBN 0-17596-248-1.

Allgemeine Elektrizitäts-Gesellschaft (AEG) Aircraft 1917

AEG D.I

AEG D.I - 1917
AEG AEG D.I

The AEG D.I was a biplane fighter of World War I. Three prototypes were ordered, but after the first two were involved in serious crashes, development was cancelled. A triplane version was built as the Dr.I. The second and third prototypes differed little except in minor details.

The D.I was powered by a Mercedes D.IIIa 6-cylinder, liquid-cooled inline engine, producing 158 hp (118 kW). The armament was twin forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine guns mounted on the deck.

Variants

  • A.E.G. D.I - 1917 prototype single seat bi-plane fighter.
  • A.E.G. Dr.I - 1917 prototype single seat tri-plane fighter.

Aircraft numbers

  • AEG D.I - first prototype serial number not known.
  • AEG D.I - second prototype serial number D4401/17.
  • AEG D.I - third prototype serial number D5002/17
  • AEG Dr.I - prototype serial number not known
AEG D.I
  • Role: Fighter aircraft
  • National Origin: German Empire
  • Manufacturer: Allgemeine Elektrizitäts-Gesellschaft (AEG)
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Year Built: 1917
  • Number Built: 3
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.III 6-cylinder, liquid-cooled, inline engine, 160 hp (118 kW)
  • Wingspan: 27 ft 11 in (8.50 m)
  • Wing area: 174 ft² (16.14 m²)
  • Length: 20 ft (6.10 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 8 in (2.65 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,764 lb (685 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,068 kg (940 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 111 kn, 128 mph (205 km/h)
  • Range: 251 nmi, 290 mi (465 km)
  • Service Ceiling: 16,400 ft (5,000 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 617 ft/min (188 m/min)
  • Wing Loading: 10 lb/ft² (58 kg/m²)
  • Power/Mass: 0.08 hp/lb (0.13 kW/kg)
  • Crew: one, pilot
  • Armament: 2 × forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine guns

References

  1. AEG D.I. (2010, December 15). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 03:14, February 27, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=AEG_D.I&oldid=402605916
  2. AEG D.I 1917 The Virtual Aircraft Museum. Retrieved 03:10, February 27, 2011, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/germany/aeg_d-1.php
  3. Gray, Peter and Thetford, Owen. German Aircraft of the First World War. London: Putnam, 2nd Ed. 1970.

AEG Dr.I

AEG Dr.I - 1917
AEG AEG Dr.I - 1917

The AEG Dr.I was a triplane fighter of World War I, built by Allgemeine Elektrizitäts-Gesellschaft in 1917 during Germany's period of experimentation of the triplane concept. The design was based on the equaly unuccessful AEG D.I.

The Dr.I was powered by a Mercedes D.IIIa 6-cylinder, liquid-cooled inline engine, producing 158 hp (118 kW). The armament was twin forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine guns mounted on the deck.

Only a single prototype was built and its poor performance meant that no further production of this model.

AEG Dr.I
  • Role: Fighter aircraft
  • Manufacturer:Allgemeine Elektrizitäts-Gesellschaft (AEG)
  • National Origin:German Empire
  • First Flight: 1917
  • Primary user: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Number built: 1
  • Developed from: AEG D.I
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1× Mercedes D.IIIa 6-cylinder, liquid-cooled inline engine, 158 hp (118 kW)
  • Wingspan: 30 ft 10⅛ in (9.40 m)
  • Length: 20 ft 0¼ in (6.10 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,562 lb (710 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 2,139 lb (970 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 92 kn, 106 mph (170 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 92 mph (148 km/h)
  • Crew: one, pilot
  • Armament: 2 × forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine guns

References

  1. AEG Dr.I. (2010, August 23). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 04:45, February 27, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=AEG_Dr.I&oldid=380535853
  2. AEG Dr I 1917 The Virtual Aircraft Museum Retrieved 04:40, February 27, 2011, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/germany/aeg_dr-1.php
  3. AEG Dr I 1917 The Virtual Aviation Museum Retrieved 04:50, February 27, 2011, from http://www.luftfahrtmuseum.com/htmi/itf/aegdr1.htm
  4. Gray, Peter and Thetford, Owen. German Aircraft of the First World War. London:Putnam, 1962.

AEG J.I

AEG J.I - 1917
AEG J.I

In 1916 Germany introduced the J-class of close support or ground-combat engagement aircraft. After the first units performed well in the battle of Verdun , the development of ground support aircraft received the highest priority. AEG designed the J.I to meet the need for armored aircraft to directly engage entrenched infantry units with concentrated machine gun fire and bombardment.

The AEG J.I was a biplane ground attack aircraft of 1917, an armored and more powerful version of the AEG C.IV reconnaissance aircraft. AEG J.I featured armor protection for the pilot and for the more powerful engine that was fitted to the heavier aircraft.

Two forward firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine guns were fitted to the floor of the observer's cockpit pointing downward at a 45° angle for engaging ground targets. One 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 machine gun was provided in the typical rear-facing defensive position.

The J.Ia version featured aileron controls on the lower wings, in addition to the upper.

AEG J.I
  • Role: Ground attack aircraft
  • National Origin: German Empire
  • Manufacturer: Allgemeine Elektrizitäts-Gesellschaft
  • Introduced: 1917
  • Related Development: AEG C.IV - AEG J.II
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Powerplant: 1 × Benz Bz.IV 6 cylinder water-cooled inline engine, 200 hp (149 kW)
  • Wingspan: 44 ft 2 in (13.46 m)
  • Wing Area: 358 ft² (33.2 m²)
  • Length: 23 ft 7½ in (7.20 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 11⅞ in (3.35 m)
  • Empty Weight: 3,201 lb (1,455 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 3,828 lb (1,740 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 82 kn, 93 mph (150 km/h)
  • Range: 203 nm, 234 mi (375 km)
  • Service Ceiling: 14,760 ft (4,500 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 0551 ft/min. (854 m/s)
  • Wing Loading: 10.7 lb/ft² (52.4 kg/m²)
  • Power/Mass: 0.104 hp/lb (0.171 kW/kg)
  • Endurance: 2.5 hrs
  • Crew: Two
  • Armament:
    • Pilot: 2 × 0.312 in (7.92 mm) fixed, downwards firing LMG 08/15 machine guns
    • Observer: 1 × 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 in rear cockpit

References

  1. AEG J.I. (2010, May 4). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 23:39, November 12, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=AEG_J.I&oldid=360030562
  2. Grey, Peter and Thetford, Owen. "German Aircraft of the First World War". London: Putnam, 1962. ISBN 0-370-00103-6.