Luftverkehrsgesellschaft m.b.H. (L.V.G. or LVG) was a German aircraft manufacturer based in Berlin-Johannisthal, which began constructing aircraft in 1912, building Farman-type aircraft. The company constructed many reconnaissance and light bomber biplanes during World War I. The raid on London in 1916 was conducted by one LVG C.IV. It dropped its bombs near London Victoria station, but was shot down by French anti-aircraft gunners on its way home.

LVG Aircraft 1914

LVG B.I

LVG B.II- 1914
LVG B.I

LVG had been involved in the operation of dirigibles before it started design, in 1912, of the company's first original design, the B.I. The B.I was an unequal-span two-seat biplane with a fixed tail-skid landing gear. It was powered by a nose-mounted 80 kW (100 hp) Mercedes D.I engine.
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LVG B.I
  • Role: Two-seat reconnaissance biplane
  • National origin: Germany
  • Manufacturer: Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft
  • Primary user: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.I inline piston engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 39 ft 9.25in (12.12 m)
  • Wing Area: 381.05 ft² (35.40 m²)
  • Height: 9 ft 8.25 in (2.95 m)
  • Length: 27 ft 2.75 in (8.30 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,600 lb (726 kg)
  • Gross weight: 2,370 lb (1,075 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 65 mph (105 km/h)
  • Endurance: 4 hours 0 min
  • Crew: 2 (pilot, observer)
  • Armament: None

References

  1. From Wikipedia LVG B.I, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LVG_B.I"
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation>". London: Studio Editions.
  3. "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft" (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing.

LVG Aircraft 1915

LVG C.II

LVG C.II - 1915
LVG C.II

The LVG C.I was a 1910s German two-seat reconnaissance biplane designed by Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft (LVG) for the Luftstreitkräfte.

The C.II was developed from the LVG B.I, with the pilot and observer positions reversed, adding a ring-mounted machine gun to the rear. The increase in weight required a larger engine, the Benz Bz.III. Few C.I's were built before the C.II was introduced. It incorporated structural improvements and a more powerful engine.

The C.II was the first fixed-wing aircraft to bomb London, when six bombs were dropped near Victoria station on 28 November 1915. (The first air raid on London was by the Zeppelin LZ 38, in the early hours of 1st June 1915.)
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LVG C.II
  • Type: Reconnaissance/light bomber
  • Manufacturer: Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft
  • Introduced: late 1915
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Number Built : approx. 300
  • Developed From: LVG B.I
  • Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.III, 160 hp (119 kW)
  • Wingspan: 42 ft 2 in (12.85 m)
  • Wing Area: 404.74 ft² (37.60 m²)
  • Length: 26 ft 7 in (8.10 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 7.25 in (2.93 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,863 lb (845 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 3,097 lb (1,405 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 81 mph (130 km/h)
  • Endurance: 4 hours
  • Service Ceiling: 13,125 ft (4,000 m)
  • Crew: Two, pilot and observer
  • Armament:
    • Gun - Pilot: 1 × flexible 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 machine gun
    • Gun - Observer: 1 × fixed, forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine gun (later production aircraft)
    • Bombs: up to 130 lb (60 kg) of light bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia LVG C.I "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LVG_C.I"
  2. Donald, David, The Encyclopedia of World Aircraft" (pg 553). (1997). Prospero Books. ISBN 1-85605-375-X
  3. Van Wyngarden, G (2006). "Early German Aces of World War I", Osprey Publishing Ltd. ISBN 1-841-76997-5

LVG Aircraft 1916

L.V.G. D.10

LVG D.10, 1916
L.V.G. D 10

Experimental single-seat fighter with wrapped plywood strip fuselage of deep gap-filling Walfisch type. The unique under-fin extending to the axle is one of the many features of this unusual-looking aeroplane which was built during 1916. Engine, 120 h.p. Mercedes D II.

L.V.G. D.10
  • Role: Experimental Fighter
  • National Origin: German Empire
  • Manufacturer: Luftverkehrsgesellschaft m.b.H.
  • First Flight: 1916
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1 x 120hp (89kW) Mercedes D II
  • Wingspan: 30 ft 2 in (9.20 m)
  • Length: 24 ft 3 in (7.40 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 2 in (3.10 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: Armament: 1 × forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine guns

References

  1. Grey & Thetford. German Aircraft of the First World War. Putnam &Company.
  2. LVG D.10, 1916 the Virtual Aircraft Museum retreived Nov/09/2012-14:32 from: http://www.aviastar.org/air/germany/lvg_d-10.php
  3. LVG D.10, 1916 flyingmachines.ru retreived Nov/09/2012-14:38 from: http://flyingmachines.ru/Site2/Crafts/Craft30276.htm

LVG Aircraft 1917

LVG C.V

LVG C.VI
LVG C.V
LVG C.V Poland 1920
LVG C.V Poland 1920

The LVG C.V was a reconnaissance aircraft produced in large numbers in Germany during World War I. It was a conventional two-bay biplane design of its day, with unstaggered wings of equal span and tandem, open cockpits for the pilot and observer. The ailerons, fitted only to the upper wing, featured aerodynamic balances that extended past the wingtips. The fuselage was a semi-monocoque construction skinned in wood.
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LVG C.V
  • Type: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft G.m.b.H. (LVG)
  • First flight: 1917
  • Powerplant: 1 × Benz Bz.IV, water-cooled in-line engine, 200 hp (150 kW)
  • Wingspan: 44 ft 7 in (13.60 m)
  • Wing area: 436 ft² (40.5 m²)
  • Length: 26 ft 6 in (8.07 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 0 in (3.36 m)
  • Empty Weight: 2,220 lb (1,009 kg)
  • Gross Weight: 3,311 lb (1,505 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 106 mph (170 km/h)
  • Endurance: 3 hours 30 min
  • Service Ceiling: 21,300 ft (6,500 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 1,100 ft/min (5.6 m/s)
  • Crew: Two, pilot and observer
  • Armament:
    • Guns - Pilot: 1 × fixed, synchronised forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15
    • Guns - Observer: 1 × trainable, rearward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14
    • Bombs: 90 lb (40 kg) bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia, LVG C.V, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LVG_C.V"
  2. Grosz, Peter M. "LVG C.V. Windsock Datafile 71": Berkhampstead: Albatross Productions. (1998).
  3. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft. London: Aerospace Publishing.
  4. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions.
  5. "World Aircraft Information Files". London: Bright Star Publishing.

L.V.G. D IV

L.V.G. D IV
L.V.G. D IV

Continuing the streamlined, ply-covered fuselage trend, the L.V.G. D IV featured a wing cellule similar to that of the earlier D II, with single-spar lower wing and vee interplane struts. The nose, of blunter proportions but still neatly spinnered, housed the vee-eight type, direct-drive, 195 h.p. Benz Bz IIIb engine.

The machine participated at the second D types Competition at Adlershof in June 1918.

L.V.G. D IV
  • Role: Experimental Fighter
  • National Origin: German Empire
  • Manufacturer: Luftverkehrsgesellschaft m.b.H.
  • First Flight: 1917?
  • Status: Prototype
  • Retired: 1918
  • Powerplant:
    • 1× 185 hp (138 kW) Benz Bz IIIbo
    • 1× 195 hp (145 kW) Benz Bz IIIbo
  • Wingspan: 27 ft. 10 ¾ in (8.50 m)
  • Wing area: 95 ft² (18.06 m²)
  • Length: 20 ft. 7 ¼ in (6.28 m)
  • Height: 10 ¼ in in (2.70 m 8 ft).
  • Take-off weight: 2,057 lb: (935 kg)
  • Empty weight: 1,496 lb (680 kg)
  • Max. speed: 112 mph (180 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 96 mph (155 km/h)
  • Climb Rate: 16,400 ft. (5,000 m.) in 28 min at loaded weight of 2,004 lb (911 kg)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine guns

References

  1. Grey & Thetford. German Aircraft of the First World War. Putnam &Company.
  2. L.V.G. D IV 1917 the Virtual Aircraft Museum retreived Nov/09/2012-14:47 from: http://www.aviastar.org/air/germany/lvg_d-4.php
  3. L.V.G. D IV 1917 flyingmachines.ru retreived Nov/09/2012-14:42 from: http://flyingmachines.ru/Site2/Crafts/Craft25806.htm

LVG Aircraft 1918

LVG C.VI

LVG C.VI - 1918
LVG C.VI Luftstreitkräfte - 1918
LVG C.VI Latvian Air Force - 1919
LVG C.VI Latvian Air Force - 1919

LVG C.VI was a German two-seat reconnaissance and artillery spotting aircraft used during World War I.

The aircraft was designed by Willy Sabersky-Müssigbrodt and developed by Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft (LVG) in 1917. The C.VI was a further development of the C.V, which Sabersky-Müssigbrodt had made for his former employer DFW. It was lighter, smaller and aerodynamically refined, although its fuselage seemed more bulky. It was a biplane of mixed, mostly wooden construction. It featured a semi-monocoque fuselage, plywood covered. Rectangular wings of wooden and metal construction, canvas covered. Upper wing of slightly greater span, shifted some 25 cm (10 in) towards front. Vertical fin plywood covered, rudder and elevators of metal frame canvas covered, stabilizers (tailplanes) of wooden frame canvas covered. Straight uncovered engine in the fuselage nose, with a chimney-like exhaust pipe. Two-blade Benz wooden propeller, 2.88 m (9.45 ft) diameter. Flat water radiator in central section of upper wing. Fixed conventional landing gear, with a straight common axle and a rear skid. Aircraft were equipped with a radio (morse send only); transmissions were by means of an antenna which could be lowered below the aircraft when needed. The crew had parachutes and heated flying suits. A total of 1,100 aircraft of the type were manufactured.

Most LVG C.VIs were used by the German military aviation in last operations of World War I, mostly on Western Front, for close reconnaissance and observation.
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LVG C.VI
  • Role: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Luft-Verkehrs-Gesellschaft G.m.b.H.
  • First flight: 1917
  • Introduction: 1918
  • Produced: 1918
  • Number built: 1,100
  • Developed from: LVG C.V
  • Designer: Sabersky-Müssigbrodt
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Operators:
    • Belgium Belgian Air Force
    • Czechoslovakia Czechoslovak Air Force
    • Finland Finnish Air Force, Suomen ilmailuliikenne Oy
    • German Empire Luftstreitkräfte Deutsche Luft-Reederei
    • Latvia Latvian Air Force
    • Lithuania Lithuanian Air Force
    • Poland Polish Air Force
    • Soviet Union
    • Sweden Swedish Navy
    • Switzerland Swiss Air Force
  • Powerplant: 1 × Benz Bz.IV 6-cylinder, water-cooled, straight engine, 200 hp (147 kW)
  • Wingspan: 42 ft 8 in (13.00 m)
  • Wing area: (37 m²)
  • Length: 24 ft 5 in (7.45 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 4 in (2.85 m)
  • Empty weight: (945 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 3,060 lb (1,390 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 92 kn, 103 mph (170 km/h)
  • Range: 216 nmi, 242 mi (400 km)
  • Service ceiling: 21300 ft (6,500 m)
  • Rate of climb: 550 ft/min (2.78 m/s)
  • Armament:
    • Pilot: 1 × .312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 fixed with an interruptor gear
    • Observer: 1 × .312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 machine gun on a ring mounting
    • Bombs: 200 lb (90 kg) of bombs
  • Crew: 2: pilot, observer

References

  1. LVG C.VI. (2012, July 1). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:20, July 16, 2012, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=LVG_C.VI&oldid=500140488
  2. Heinonen, Timo: Thulinista Hornetiin - Keski-Suomen ilmailumuseon julkaisuja 3, Keski-Suomen ilmailumuseo, 1992, ISBN 951-95688-2-4
  3. Krzysztof Choloniewski, Wieslaw Baczkowski: Samoloty wojskowe obcych konstrukcji 1918-1939. Tomik 2 (Barwa w lotnictwie polskim no.7), WKiL, Warsaw 1987, ISBN 83-206-0728-0 (Polish language)
  4. Lewis, Michael: 1914-18 Connections website. Restoration of Brussels Air Museum LVG CVI

L.V.G. D V

L.V.G. D IV
L.V.G. D V

Another 195 h.p. Benz-powered prototype, the D V of 1918 reverted to a slab-sided ply-covered fuselage. Most singular feature was the juxtapositioning of the wing surfaces, the lower one being of much broader chord, and the main lifting surface. The narrow-chord upper-wing panels pivoted differentially outboard of the centre-section, the entire surface of both wings acting as "ailerons" to provide lateral manoeuvre.

In this L.V.G. the streamlining embraces both the interplane and plane-cum-fuselage connectiong twin-struts, of more or less V structure. The inner set is provided with a round cutting in the streamlining. The steepness, though not markedly whale type, camouflaged body of the L.V.G. may be result of the employment of a powerful stationary motor. The chord of the lower plane of the L.V.G. looks large for a scout; the rudder asks for comment. Considering the large impulses on a scout rudder from hard work the unsupported position seems daring. The hinged fixed plane and elevator position of the L.V.G. Scout is that of the Brandenburg seaplane faschion.

LVG D.V
  • Role: Experimental Fighter
  • National Origin: German Empire
  • Manufacturer: Luftverkehrsgesellschaft m.b.H.
  • First Flight: 1918
  • Status: Prototype
  • Retired: 1918
  • Powerplant: 1× 195 hp (145 kW) Benz Bz IIIbo
  • Wingspan: 30 ft 6 in (9.00 m)
  • Wing area: 205.59 ft² (19.10 m²)
  • Length: 24 ft 7 in (7.20 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 6 in (2.90 m)
  • Take-off weight: 2028 lb (920 kg)
  • Empty weight: 1521 lb (690 kg)
  • Max. speed: 121 mph (195 km/h)
  • Cruise speed:104 mph (168 km/h)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine guns

References

  1. C.G. Grey (Editor) Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1919. David & Charles (November 1969) ISBN-10: 0715346474 ISBN-13: 978-0715346471
  2. Grey & Thetford. German Aircraft of the First World War. Putnam &Company.
  3. L.V.G. D V 1918 the Virtual Aircraft Museum retreived Nov/09/2012-14:49 from: http://www.aviastar.org/air/germany/lvg_d-5.php
  4. L.V.G. D V 1918 flyingmachines.ru retreived Nov/09/2012-14:44 from: http://flyingmachines.ru/Site2/Crafts/Craft25807.htm