Aviatik C.I

Aviatik-Berg (Lohner) C.I - 1915
Aviatik (Lohner) C.I

The Aviatik C.I was a World War I reconnaissance aircraft which first came into service in September 1915 . It was the successor to the Aviatik B.I and B.II models. The observer sat in front of the pilot in this model which limited the gunner's field of fire. However, the opportunity was presented for more aggressive aircrews to take an increased offensive approach in engaging enemy aircraft. The positions of the pilot and gunner were reversed in the C.Ia version. Later models, the C.II and C.III were produced in large numbers and had more powerful engines.

Variants

Aviatik C.I
  • Type: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • National Origin: Austria-Hungary
  • Manufacturer: Österreichische-Ungarische Flugzeugfabrik
  • Designed by: Julius von Berg
  • First Flight: 1915
  • Entered Service: September 1915
  • Retired: 1917
  • Primary User: KuKLFT
  • Powerplant: 1× Mercedes D III 6 cylinder water cooled in-line, 160 hp (119 kW)
  • Wingspan: 41 ft 0¼ in (12.5 m)
  • Wing Area: 465.4 ft² (43 m²)
  • Length: 26 ft 0 in (7.925 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 81/8 in (2.95 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,650 lb (750 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,948 lb (1,340 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 88.75 mph (142 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 3,500 m (11,500 ft)
  • Wing Loading: 6.33 lb/ft² (31.2 kg/m²)
  • Power/Mass: 0.054hp/lb (0.089 kW/kg)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Climb to 3,050 ft (1,000 m): 12 min
  • Crew: Two
  • Armament: 1 × machine gun in rear cockpit

References

  1. Aviatik C.I. (2010, February 21). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 03:26, July 2, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Aviatik_C.I&oldid=345501830
  2. Van Wyngarden, G. "Early German Aces of World War 1". Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 2006. ISBN 1-84176-997-5
  3. Taylor, Michael J H. "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". Portland House, 1989. ISBN 0-517-69186-8
  4. Gray, Peter and Thetford, Owen. "German Aircraft of the First World War". London:Putnam, 1962.

Lloyd C-Type (C.II, C.III and C.IV)

Lloyd C.III - 1915
Lloyd C.III

The Lloyd C.II and its derivatives, the C.III and C.IV were reconnaissance aircraft produced in Austria-Hungary during the First World War. They were based on the Lloyd company's pre-war C.I design, and like it, were conventional biplanes with swept-back wings.

After the outbreak of World War I, the original aircraft was refined somewhat by Lloyd designers Wizina and von Melczer, featuring a reduced wingspan and wing area but increased weight. An 0.315 in (8 mm) Schwarzlose machine gun was added on a semi-circular mount for an observer, giving the aircraft a means of self defence against enemy fighters.

Beginning in 1915, one hundred examples of this type were built - fifty by Lloyd at their plant in Aszód, and another fifty by WKF in Vienna.

The C.III was almost identical to the C.II except for the use of a 160 hp (120 kW) Austro-Daimler engine, which increased the top speed to 83 mph (133 km/h) The C.III was produced by both Lloyd and Wiener Karosserie und Flugzeugfabrik (WKF), with total production run amounted to between 50 to 60 aircraft.

Variants

Lloyd C.II - C.IV
  • Type: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • National Origin: Austria-Hungary
  • Manufacturer:
  • Ungarische Lloyd Flugzeug und Motorenfabrik
  • Wiener Karosserie und Flugzeugfabrik (WKF)
  • Designed By: Wizina and von Melczer
  • First Flight: 1915
  • Primary User: KuKLFT
  • Number Built:
    • C.II: 100
    • C.III: 50
    • C.IV: 40
  • Powerplant:
    • 1 × Hiero inline engine, 145 hp (108 kW)
    • 1 × Austro-Daimler Inline engine 160 hp (120 kW)
  • Wingspan: 45 ft 11 in (14.00 m)
  • Wing Area: 409 ft² (38.0 m²)
  • Length: 29 ft 6 in (9.00 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 2 in (3.40 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,990 lb (905 kg)
  • Gross Weight: 2,970 lb (1,350 kg)
  • Maximum Speed:
  • Hiero: 80 mph (128 km/h)
  • Austro-Daimler: 83 mph (133 km/h)
  • Range: 250 miles (400 km)
  • Service Ceiling: 9,800 ft (3,000 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 1,100 ft/min (5.6 m/s)
  • Crew: Two, pilot and observer
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1 × trainable 0.315 in (8 mm) Schwarzlose machine gun for observer
    • Bombs: 200 lb (90 kg) of bombs

References

  1. Lloyd C.II. (2009, September 12). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 03:31, July 2, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Lloyd_C.II&oldid=313351507
  2. Grosz, Peter M. (2002). "Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One". Colorado: Flying Machine Press.
  3. Gunston, Bill (1993). "World Encyclopedia of Aircraft Manufacturers". Annapolis: Naval Institute Press.
  4. Murphy, Justin D. (2005). "Military Aircraft: Origins to 1918". Santa Barbara: ABC-Clio.
  5. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions.

Lloyd FJ 40.05 - 1915

Lloyd FJ 40.05 - 1915
Lloyd FJ 40.05 - 1915

The Lloyd FJ 40.05 was a very unorthadox Austrian experimental fighter/reconnaisence biplane built in 1915. The design's faults were many and virtues were few. The aircraft never went beyond initial testing before development was halted.

The primary stumbling block to the evolution of an effective fighter aircraft was the inability to fire into the forward arc without losing a propeller. Until the machine gun synchronization was invented, various aircraft manufacturers tried of solutions including pusher engine configuration attaching metal plates to the propeller, firing sideways, mounting a machine gun on the upper wing to fire over the arc of the prop, etc. None of these stop-gap measures proved to be the optimal method to achieve the goal of creating a truly efficient fighter-craft.The Lloyd Company designers tried a radically different approach to solve the problem. In 1915 they designed a two seat aircraft designated FJ (Flugzeugjäger) and received the Austro Hungarian Air Force designation 40.05.
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Lloyd FJ 40.05
  • Role: Fighter/Reconnaissance aircraft
  • National Origin: Austro Hungary
  • Manufacturer: Ungarische Lloyd Flugzeug und Motorenfabrik
  • Designed By: Ing. Melczer
  • First Flight: January 1916
  • Retired: 1916
  • Number Built: 2
  • Status: Prototype
  • Operater: Kaiserliche und Königliche Luftfahrtruppen - K.u.K. LFT
  • Powerplant: 1 × 160 hp (118KW) MAG-Daimler 6-cyl in-line water cooled engine
  • Wing Span: 36.646 ft (11.17m)
  • Wing area:88.58 ft² (27 m²)
  • Length:22.7 ft (6.92m)
  • Height:10.17 ft (3.1m)
  • Empty Weight:1,657 lb (752 kg)
  • Loaded Weight:2,120 lb (962kg)
  • Ceiling:16,404 ft (5000m)
  • Range:310 miles (500km)
  • Crew: 2 (1 pilot, 1 observer/gunner)
  • Armament: 1 × 0.315 in (8 mm) Schwarzlose machine gun

References

  1. FLUG-Informationen, 41. annual release, issue IV/1991
  2. Jaroslaw Kierat. Lloyd FJ 40.05 The Internet Modeler site http://www.internetmodeler.com/2008/may/aviation/planet_lloyd.php

Lohner B.VII

Lohner B.VII
Lohner B.VII
Lohner C.I
Lohner C.I - 1916

The unarmed Lohner B.VII and its armed derivative the C.I were military reconnaissance aircraft produced in Austria-Hungary during World War I. They were the ultimate developments in a family of aircraft that had begun with the B.I prior to the outbreak of war, and were the first members of that family that proved suitable for front-line service during the conflict. Like their predecessors, the B.VII and C.I were conventional biplanes with characteristic swept-back wings.
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Lohner B.VII
  • Type: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • National Origin: Austria-Hungary
  • Manufacturer: Lohner
  • Entered Service: August 1915
  • Primary User: KuKLFT
  • Variants:
    • B.VII: unarmed version with 150 hp (110 kW) or 160 hp (120 kW) Austro Daimler engine (73 built)
    • C.I: version with 160 hp (120 kW) Austro Daimler engine and armed with single machine gun on trainable mount for observer (40 built)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Austro-Daimler, 150 hp (110 kW)
  • Wingspan: 50 ft 6 in (15.40 m)
  • Length: 31 ft 2 in (9.50 m)
  • Height: 12 ft 4 in (3.75 m)
  • Wing Area: 473 ft² (44.0 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 2,000 lb (913 kg)
  • Endurance: 6 hours
  • Rate of Climb: 350 ft/min (1.8 m/s)
  • Crew: Two, pilot and observer

References

  1. Lohner B.VII. (2009, August 26). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 03:29, July 2, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Lohner_B.VII&oldid=310220492
  2. Chant, Christopher (2002). "Austro-Hungarian Aces of World War 1". Oxford: Osprey.
  3. Grosz, Peter M. (2002). "Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One". Colorado: Flying Machine Press.
  4. Gunston, Bill (1993). "World Encyclopedia of Aircraft Manufacturers". Annapolis: Naval Institute Press.
  5. Murphy, Justin D. (2005). "Military Aircraft: Origins to 1918". Santa Barbara: ABC-Clio.
  6. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions.