Martinsyde S.1

Martinsyde S.1
Martinsyde S.1

The Martinsyde Scout 1 was a British single-seat biplane aircraft built by Martinsyde Limited and deployed in the early part of the First World War. The S.1 was powered by a Gnome engine mounted in a tractor configuration.

Sixty of the S.1 were built and these were used for about 6 months on the Western Front by the Royal Flying Corps before it was relegated to training. Although initially intended for use in Home Defence operating from the UK, it was found to be inadequate for that too.

Martinsyde S.1
  • Type: Single-seat scout
  • Manufacturer: Martinsyde
  • Introduction: 1914
  • Primary User: Royal Flying Corps
  • Number Built: 60
  • Powerplant: 1 × Gnome rotary piston, 80 hp (60 kW)
  • Wingspan: 27 ft 8 in (8.43 m)
  • Wing Area: 280 ft² (26.01 m²)
  • Length: 21 ft 0 in (6.4 m)
  • Maximum Speed: 87 mph (140 km/h)
  • Crew: One
  • Armament: 1× Forward firing 0.303in (7.7mm) Lewis machine gun

References

  1. Martinsyde S.1. (2010, April 22). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 09:04, July 30, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Martinsyde_S.1&oldid=357674984
  2. Bruce, J.M. War Planes of the First World War: Volume One Fighters. London:Macdonald, 1965, p.146.

Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.2

RAF SE.2 - 1913
Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.2 - 1913
RAF SE.2a - 1914
RAF SE.2a - 1914

The Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.2 (Scout Experimental) was an early British single-seat scout aircraft. Designed and built at the Royal Aircraft Factory in 1913 as the B.S.1, the prototype was rebuilt several times before serving with the Royal Flying Corps, being operated over the Western Front in the early months of the First World War. In 1912, a team at the Royal Aircraft Factory, lead by Geoffrey de Havilland, started design of a single seat scout, or fast reconnaissance aircraft, the first aircraft in the world specifically designed for this role. The design was a small tractor biplane, and was named the B.S.1 (standing for Blériot Scout) after Louis Blériot, a pioneer of tractor configuration aircraft. It had a wooden monocoque circular section fuselage, and single-bay wings. Lateral control was by wing warping,while the aircraft was initially fitted with a small rudder without a fixed fin, and an all moving elevator. It was powered by a two-row, 14-cylinder Gnome rotary engine rated at 100 hp (75 kW).
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Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.2
  • Role: Scout aircraft
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Royal Aircraft Factory
  • Designed By: Geoffrey de Havilland (B.S.1)
  • First Flight: March 1913
  • Introduced: 1914
  • Retired: 1915
  • Primary User: Royal Flying Corps
  • Number Built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1 × Gnome Rotary engine, 80 hp (60 kW)
  • Wingspan: 27 ft 6¼ in (8.39 m)
  • Wing Area: 188 ft² (17.5m²)
  • Length: 20 ft 10 in (6.35 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 4⅛ in (2.82 m)
  • Empty Weight: 720 lb (327 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,132 lb (515 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 91 mph (79 knots, 147 km/h)
  • Endurance: 3 hr
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × 0.303 in rifles

References

  1. "Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.2". (2010, August 3). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 03:39, November 15, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Royal_Aircraft_Factory_S.E.2&oldid=376984114
  2. Bruce, J.M. "British Aeroplanes 1914-18". London: Putnam, 1957.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "The Aeroplanes of the Royal Flying Corps" (Military Wing). London: Putnam, 1982. ISBN 0-370-30084-X.
  4. Hare, Paul R. "The Royal Aircraft Factory". London:Putnam, 1990. ISBN 0-85177-843-7.
  5. Jackson, A.J. "De Havilland Aircraft since 1909". London: Putnam, Third edition, 1987. ISBN 0-85177-802-X.
  6. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, USA: Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.

Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.4a

RAF SE.4a - 1914
Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.4a

The Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.4a was an experimental British single-engined scout aircraft of the First World War. Four S.E.4a aircraft were built, being used for research purposes and as home-defence fighters by the Royal Flying Corps. In spite of its type number it had little or no relationship to the earlier S.E.4

In 1915, Henry Folland of the Royal Aircraft Factory designed a new single-engined scout aircraft, the S.E.4a. While it had a similar designation to Folland's earlier Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.4 of 1914, which had been designed to be the fastest aircraft in the world, the S.E.4a was fundamentally a new aircraft, intended to investigate the relationship between stability and manoeuvrability, and for possible operational use.
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Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.4a
  • Role: Scout aircraft
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Royal Aircraft Factory
  • Designed By: Henry Folland
  • First flight: 25 June 1915
  • Retired: 1917
  • Primary user: Royal Flying Corps
  • Number built: 4
  • Developed from: Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.4
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1 × Le Rhône rotary engine, 80 hp (60 kW)
  • Wingspan: 27 ft 5 in (8.36 m)
  • Length: 20 ft 10 in (6.35 m)
  • Height: 9ft 5 in (2.87 m)
  • Maximum speed: 90 mph (67 knots, 145 km/h) at sea level
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: Provision for 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun above upper wing

References

  1. "Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.4a". (2009, October 14). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 18:35, November 25, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Royal_Aircraft_Factory_S.E.4a&oldid=319904390
  2. Bruce, J.M. "British Aeroplanes 1914-18". London:Putnam, 1957.
  3. Bruce J.M. "War Planes of the First World War: Volume Two Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1968. ISBN 0 356 01473 8.
  4. Bruce, J.M. "The Aeroplanes of the Royal Flying Corps" (Military Wing). London:Putnam, 1982. ISBN 0 370 30084 x.
  5. Lewis, Peter. "The British Fighter since 1912". London:Putnam, Fourth edition, 1979. ISBN 0 370 10049 2.
  6. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.

Sopwith Tabloid

Sopwith Tabloid

Introduced toward the end of 1913, the Sopwith Tabloid won the Schneider Trophy at Monaco in 1914. An unarmed single-seater, it was one of the first British biplanes to be used in combat.

On the afternoon of 9 October 1914, in the first successful bombing mission of the war, the Royal Naval Air Service sent two Tabloids to attack the Zeppelin sheds at Dusseldorf and Cologne. Only one of them reached its target but Zeppelin Z-9 was destroyed in its shed at Dusseldorf when the Tabloid pilot released two 20 pound bombs from a height of about 600 feet.

Sopwith Tabloid
  • Type: Reconaissance/Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Sopwith Aviation Company
  • First Introduced: 1913
  • Number built: 40 Tabloid, 160 Schneider
  • Powerplant:1× Gnome Monosoupape air cooled 9-cylinder rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wing Span: 25 ft 6 in (7.77 m)
  • Length: 23 ft (7.02 m)
  • Height: 10 ft (3.05 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,200 lb (545 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,580 lb (717 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 80 knots, 92 mph (148 km/h)
  • Range: 315 miles, 275 nm (510 km)
  • Service ceiling: 15,000 ft (4,600 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament:
    • Guns: Some RNAS aircraft fitted with 1× forward-firing 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun
    • Bombs: 2× 20 lb (9 kg)

References

  1. From Wikipedia Sopwith Tabloid, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sopwith_Tabloid"
  2. Bruce, J.M. "The Sopwith Tabloid, Schneider and Baby: Historic Military Aircraft No.17, Part I". Flight. 8 November 1957. pp. 733-736.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "The Sopwith Tabloid, Schneider and Baby: Historic Military Aircraft No.17, Part II". Flight. 15 November 1957. pp. 765-766.
  4. Bruce, J.M. "The Sopwith Tabloid, Schneider and Baby: Historic Military Aircraft No.17, Part IV". Flight. 29 November 1957. pp. 845-848.
  5. Donald, David, ed (1997). "The Encyclopedia of World Aircraft". Prospero Books. ISBN 1-85605-375-X.
  6. Holmes, Tony (2005). "Jane's Vintage Aircraft Recognition Guide". London: Harper Collins. ISBN 0 0071 9292 4.
  7. Lamberton, W.M. (1960). "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Herts: Harleyford Publications Ltd.. pp. 58-59.
  8. Thetford, Owen. "British Naval Aircraft since 1912". London:Putnam, Fourth edition, 1978. ISBN 0 370 30021 1.