Armstrong Whitworth Ara

Armstrong-Whitworth Ara - 1918
Armstrong Whitworth Ara

The Armstrong Whitworth Ara was an unsuccessful British single-seat biplane fighter aircraft of the First World War built by Armstrong Whitworth.

In early 1918, the British Air Ministry wrote RAF Specification Type 1 for a single-seat fighter to replace the Sopwith Snipe. The specified engine was the ABC Dragonfly, a new radial engine which had been ordered into productioon based on promised performance before any testing had been carried out. To meet this specification, Armstong Whitworth's chief designer, Fred Murphy, produced the Armstrong Whitworth Ara, three prototypes being ordered.
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Armstrong Whitworth Ara
  • Role: Fighter
  • National origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Armstrong-Whitworth
  • Designed by: Fred Murphy
  • First flight: 1919
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number built: 2
  • Powerplant: 1 × ABC Dragonfly air cooled radial engine, 320 hp (239 kW)
  • Wingspan: 27 ft 5 in (8.36 m)
  • Wing area: 257 ft² (23.9 m²)
  • Length: 20 ft 3 in (6.17 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 10 in (2.39 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,320 lb (600 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1,930 lb (877 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 150 mph (242 km/h)
  • Endurance: 3¼ hours
  • Service ceiling: 28,000 ft (8,500 m)
  • Rate of climb: 2,200 ft/min (11 m/s)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine guns

References

  1. "Armstrong Whitworth Ara". (2010, September 1). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 04:48, November 27, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Armstrong_Whitworth_Ara&oldid=382240377
  2. Bruce, J.M. (1965). "War Planes of the First World War:Volume One: Fighters", p.20, p22. London: Macdonald.
  3. Mason, Francis K. (1992). "British Fighters since 1912", p.148. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  4. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1990). "Jane's Fighting Aircraft of World War I". London: Studio Editions. p.48-49.

Armstrong Whitworth Armadillo

Armstrong-Whitworth Armadillo
Armstrong Whitworth Armadillo

The Armstrong Whitworth Armadillo was a British single-seat biplane fighter aircraft built by Armstrong Whitworth. The aircraft was a two-bay biplane with a square section fuselage. The engine in the nose was enclosed by a circular cowl with a deep hump above the cowl housing twin 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine guns.

The Armadillo was designed in early 1918 by Fred Murphy, who had succeeded F Koolhoven as chief designer to Armstrong Whitworth. The F.M.4 Armadillo was developed as a private venture single-seat fighter. The aircraft was powered by a Bentley BR2 rotary engine. The development program began construction of two prototypes.

By the time the Armadillo appeared, in summer 1918, the Sopwith Snipe had already entered large scale production. The Snipe's performance avantage wone out and the Armadillo was abandoned. The project was canceled leaving the second prototype uncompleted.

Armstrong Whitworth Armadillo
  • Type: Fighter
  • National Origin: British
  • Manufacturer: Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft
  • Designed By: F. Murphy
  • First Flight: 1918
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number Built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1 × Bentley Bentley B.R.2 nine-cylinder rotary engine, 230 hp (172 kW)
  • Wingspan: 27 ft 9 in (8.46 m)
  • Wing Area: 232 ft² (21.6 m²)
  • Length: 18 ft 10 in (5.74 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 10 in (2.39 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,250 lb (568 kg)
  • Gross Weight: 1,860 lb (845 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 125 mph (201 km/h)
  • Endurance: 2 hours 45 min
  • Service Ceiling: 24,000 ft (7,300 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 1,500 [3] ft/min (7.8 m/s)
  • Climb to: 10,000 ft 6 min 30 sec
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × .303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine guns

References

  1. Armstrong Whitworth Armadillo. (2010, May 4). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 07:19, July 4, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Armstrong_Whitworth_Armadillo&oldid=360031868
  2. Bruce, J.M. (1965). War Planes of the First World War:Volume One: Fighters. London: Macdonald, p.19.
  3. Mason, Francis K. (1992). British Fighters since 1912. Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, p.138-139. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  4. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1990). Jane's Fighting Aircraft of World War I. London: Studio Editions. p. 49.

Austin A.F.T.3 Osprey

Austin A.F.T.3 Osprey
Austin A.F.T.3 Osprey

The Austin A.F.T.3 Osprey was a prototype British fighter triplane of the First World War. Developed by the motor car manufacturer Austin as a replacement to the Sopwith Camel, only one was built, the Sopwith Snipe being preferred.

In 1917, Britain's War Office issued Specification A.1.A for a single seat fighter to replace the Sopwith Camel. To meet this requirement, the Austin Motor Company, already a large scale manufacturer of aircraft, produced a design for a single-engined triplane, the A.F.T.3 Osprey. receiving a licence to build three prototypes as a private venture.

The Osprey was of conventional wood and fabric construction, with single-bay triplane wings. It was powered by a Bentley BR2 rotary engine, and featured the required armament of two Vickers machine guns and a single Lewis gun. The synchronised Vickers guns were mounted ahead of the pilot, while the Lewis gun was mounted on a movable mounting on the centre section of the middle wing, where it had a very limited field of fire, with the large diameter propellor blocking any forward fire.
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Austin A.F.T.3 Osprey
  • Type: Fighter Triplane aircraft
  • National Origin: British
  • Manufacturer: Austin Motor Company
  • First Flight: February 1918
  • Flight Trials: March-June 1918
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number Built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1× Bentley BR2 rotary engine, 230 hp (172 kW)
  • Wingspan: 23 ft (7.01 m)
  • Wing Area: 233 ft² (21.7m²)
  • Length: 17 ft 7 in (5.36 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 8 in (3.25 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,106 lb (503 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,888 lb (858 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 118.5 mph (103 knots, 191 km/h) at 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 19,000 ft (5,790 m)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Climb to 10,000 ft (3,050 m): 10 min 20 s
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament:
    • Guns Forward: 2 × forward firing, synchronised 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine guns
    • Guns Aft: 1× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun on semi-free mounting on rear of middle wing

References

  1. From Wikipedia Austin Osprey, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Austin_Osprey"
  2. Bruce, J.M. "British Aeroplanes 1914-18". London:Putnam, 1957, p.33.
  3. Bruce, J.M. War Planes of the First World War:Volume One: Fighters". London:Macdonald, 1965, p.27-29.
  4. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992, p.128, p.273. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.

Avro 531 Spider

Avro 531 Spider - 1918
Avro 531 Spider

The Avro 531 Spider was a British fighter aircraft built by Avro during the First World War. It did not proceed past the prototype stage.

An unsponsored private-venture single-seat fighter designed by Roy Chadwick and flown for the first time in April 1918, the Spider made use of a number of Avro 504 components and had a fabric-covered wooden structure with a system of Warren-girder steel-tube interplane struts.

The upper wing was mounted close to the fuselage and directly above the cockpit. In its original form, the Spider was powered by a 110hp Le Rhone 9J nine-cylinder rotary engine, and proved to possess exceptional manoeuvrability, but overall performance was not sufficiently in advance of the contemporary Sopwith Camel to warrant quantity production. Armament comprised one fixed synchronised 7.7mm Vickers machine gun, and a 130hp Clerget 9B rotary was later fitted.
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Avro 531 Spider and 538
  • Role: Fighter
  • National Origin: Britian
  • Manufacturer: Avro
  • Designer: Roy Chadwick
  • First flight: April 1918
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number built: 2
  • Powerplant: 1 × Clerget rotary, 130 hp (97 kW)
  • Wingspan: 28 ft 6 in (8.69 m)
  • Wing area: 189 ft² (17.6 m²)
  • Length: 20 ft 6 in (6.25 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 10 in (2.39 m)
  • Empty weight: 963 lb (437 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1,517 lb (688 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 120 mph (193 km/h)
  • Range: 250 miles (400 km)
  • Service ceiling: 19,000 ft (5,970 m)
  • Rate of climb: 1,250 ft/min (6.4 m/s)
  • Crew: one pilot
  • Armament: 1 × fixed, forward-firing 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun

References

  1. Avro 531 Spider. (2010, September 15). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 00:46, November 18, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Avro_531_Spider&oldid=384956305
  2. Avro 531 Spider 1918 Back to the Virtual Aircraft Museum http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/avro_spider.php
  3. Jackson, A.J. Avro Aircraft since 1908. London: Putnam Aeronautical Books, 1990. ISBN 0-85177-834-8.
  4. Taylor, Michael J. H. Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions, 1989, p. 93.
  5. World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing, File 889, Sheet 94.

BAT Bantam

F.K.22 Bantam I - 1917
BAT F.K.22 Bantam I - 1917
F.K.23 Bantam MkI - 1918
F.K.23 Bantam MkI - 1918

The BAT F.K.23 Bantam was a British single-seat fighter biplane produced by British Aerial Transport Company Limited of London during World War I.

Frederick Koolhoven's first design for the British Aerial Transport Company (BAT) was the F.K.22 single-seat fighter. It was a two-bay biplane of wooden construction. It was planned to have a 120hp (90 kW) A.B.C Mosquito radial engine but the failure of this engine led to the installation of the 170hp (127kW) A.B.C.Wasp I in the first and third aircraft. The second machine was fitted with a 100hp (75kW) Gnome Monosoupape rotary engine and was the first to fly at Martlesham Heath in January 1918.
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F.K.23 Bantam
  • Role: Single-seat Fighter
  • Nationa Origin: Great Britian
  • Manufacturer: British Aerial Transport Company Limited
  • Designed by: Frederick Koolhoven
  • First flight: 1918
  • Introduced: 1921
  • Number built: 15
  • Operators:
    • France: French Air Force 1 evaluation aircraft.
    • Netherlands: Koolhoven 1 aircraft.
    • United Kingdom: Royal Air Force 1 aircraft.
    • United States: United States Army Air Corps 1 evaluation aircraft.
  • Variants:
    • F.K.22 Bantam I: Prototypes and evaluation version, 2 built.
    • F.K.23 Bantam II: Production aircraft, 3 prototypes + 9 aircraft were built.
    • F.K.27: Two-seat racing variant, 1 built.
  • Powerplant: 1 × A.B.C Wasp I radial piston, 170 hp (127 kw)
  • Wingspan: 25 ft 0 in (7.62 m)
  • Wing area: 185 ft² (17.19²)
  • Length: 18 ft 5 in (5.61 m)
  • Height: 6ft 9 in (2.06 m)
  • Empty weight: 833 lb (378 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 1,321 lb (599 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 128 mph (206 km/h)
  • Service ceiling: 20,000 ft (6100 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 fixed forward firing 0.303in (7.7mm) Vickers machine-gun

References

  1. BAT Bantam. (2010, September 15). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 08:37, October 25, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=BAT_Bantam&oldid=385039948
  2. F.K.23 Bantam Retrieved 08:38, October 25, 2010 http://www.flugzeuginfo.net/acdata_php/acdata_bat_fk23_en.php
  3. BAT FK23 Bantam Walkaround photos at IdFlieg.com Retrieved 08:39, October 25, 2010 http://www.idflieg.com/lelystad_BAT_FK23_Bantam.htm
  4. Koolhoven Aeroplanes Foundation Retrieved 08:40, October 25, 2010 http://www.koolhoven.com/history/airplanes/bat/
  5. B.A.T. F.K.23 Bantam I Retrieved 09:02, October 25, 2010 http://www.zap16.com/2008/10/bat-fk23-bantam-i/
  6. Wings Palette - BAT FK.23 Bantam I Retrieved 08:36, October 25, 2010 http://wp.scn.ru/en/ww1/f/527
  7. B.A.T. F.K.22 (Bantam II) 1917 Retrieved 09:07, October 25, 2010 http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/bat_fk-22.php
  8. B.A.T. F.K.23 (Bantam I) 1918 Retrieved 09:08, October 25, 2010
  9. Allied Models BAT Bantam FK 22 Retrieved 09:17, October 25, 2010 http://www.wwi-models.org/Images/Christy/Allied/index.html
  10. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing.
  11. Jackson, A.J. (1974). British Civil Aircraft since 1919 Volume 1. London: Putnam. ISBN 0 370 10006 9.

Royal Aircraft Factory AE.3 Ram

 RAF  AE.3 Ram - 1918
RAF AE.3 Ram - 1918

The armored attack aircraft (Armored Experimental). The first prototype, Spring 1918. The airplane was built with RAF FE.9 fighters components. Three prototypes were built.

RAF AE.3 Ram
  • Type: Ground attack
  • National Origin: British
  • Manufacturer: Royal Aircraft Factory
  • First Flight: Spring 1918
  • Number Built: 3
  • Status: Prototype
  • Developed from: RAF FE.9
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
  • Forward: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis guns
  • Rear: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun

Sopwith Buffalo

Sopwith Buffalo
Sopwith Buffalo

The Sopwith Buffalo was a British armored fighter/reconnaissance aircraft of the First World War. A single-engined biplane, two examples of the Buffalo were built by Sopwith to carry out reconnaissance missions low over the trenches while protected against machine-gun fire from the ground, but no production followed, with the end of the war removing the need for such an aircraft.

In July 1918, the British Air Ministry requested Sopwith, who was already building the Sopwith Salamander armored single-seat ground attack fighter, to build an armored two-seat aircraft to carry out the dangerous contact patrol mission. This mission involved flying at low altitude over the battlefield to locate and keep in contact with attacking forces, therefore keeping commanders in touch with the progress of the battle. This exposed aircraft carrying out such missions to heavy small arms fire from enemy trenches, resulting in heavy casualties.
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Sopwith Buffalo
  • Role: Armored fighter/reconnaissance aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Sopwith Aviation Company
  • First flight: September 19, 1918
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number built: 2
  • Developed from: Sopwith Bulldog
  • Powerplant: 1× Bentley BR.2 rotary engine, 230 hp (172 kW)
  • Wingspan: 36 ft 6 in (10.52 m)
  • Wing area: 326 sq ft (30.3 m²)
  • Length: 23 ft 3½in (7.10 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 6 in (2.90 m)
  • Empty weight: 2,178 lb (990 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 3,071 lb (1,396 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 114 mph (99 knots, 184 km/h) at 1,000 ft (300 m)
  • Service ceiling: 9,000 ft (2,700 m)
  • Climb to 3,000 ft (900 m): 4 min 55 sec
  • Range: 275 mi (239 nmi, 443 km/h)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Gun - Pilot: 1× forward firing 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun
    • Gun - Observer: 1× flexibly mounted 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun in rear cockpit

References

  1. Bruce, J.M. "British Aeroplanes 1914-18". London:Putnam, 1957.
  2. Bruce, J.M. "The First British armoured Brigade",Part 3. Air International, April 1979, Vol 16 No. 4. Bromley, UK:Fine Scroll Publishing. pp. 182-190, 199-200.
  3. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  4. "Milestones:The Sopwith Machines". Flight, 6 February 1919. pp. 163-174.
  5. Robertson, Bruce. "Sopwith–The Man and his Aircraft". Letchworth, UK:Air Review, 1970. ISBN 0 900 435 15 1

Sopwith Bulldog

The Sopwith 2FR.2 Bulldog was a prototype British two-seat fighter of the First World War. A single-engined biplane, the Bulldog was a fighter/reconnaissance aircraft intended to replace the Bristol F.2 Fighter, but was unsuccessful, with no replacement for the Bristol Fighter being purchased.

In August 1917, the Sopwith Aviation Company started design of a two-seat fighter reconnaissance aircraft intended to replace the Bristol F.2 Fighter, and received permission to build prototypes of the Sopwith FR.2. It was intended to power the FR.2 with a 200 hp (149 kW) Hispano-Suiza 8 water-cooled V-8 engine, but the Hispano was in great demand, and it was decided to switch to the new Clerget 11, an eleven-cylinder rotary engine, a change which led to the prospective design being redesignated 2FR.2.

The Bulldog was a compact single-bay biplane resembling the first prototype Sopwith Snipe single-seat fighter. The pilot sat under the upper wing, with his head and shoulders protruding through a large gap in the centre section, while the observer's cockpit was aft of the trailing edge of the upper wing. Armament was two synchronised Vickers machine guns in a hump ahead of the pilot, while the observer/gunner was provided with two Lewis guns, one on a telescopic mounting forward of the observer's cockpit, and the second on a pillar mounting to give rearward defence.
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Sopwith Bulldog Mk.I, two-bay wings
  • Role: Fighter/reconnaissance aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Sopwith
  • First flight: 1918
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number built: 2
  • Powerplant: 1× Clerget 11Eb 11-cylinder rotary engine, 200 hp (149 kW)
  • Wingspan: 33 ft 9 in (10.29 m)
  • Wing area: 335 ft² (31.4 m²)
  • Length: 23 ft 0 in (7.01 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 9 in (2.67 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,441 lb (655 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 2,495 lb (1,134 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 109 mph (95 km/h, 175 km/h) at 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
  • Service ceiling: 15,000 ft (4,570 m)
  • Climb to 10,000 ft (3,050 m): 15 min 35 sec
  • Endurance: 2 hours
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Guns- Pilot: 2× forward firing .303 in Vickers machine guns
    • Guns- Observer: 2× Lewis guns in rear cockpit

References

  1. From Wikipedia Sopwith Bulldog, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sopwith_Bulldog"
  2. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes of the First World War: Volume Three Fighters. London:Macdonald, 1969. ISBN 0356 01490 8.
  3. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. "The Complete Book of Fighters". New York:Smithmark, 1994. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  4. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.

Sopwith Swallow

Sopwith Swallow
Sopwith Swallow

The Sopwith Swallow single-seat fighter monoplane was basicly an F.1 Camel fuselage built by Boulton & Paul, which Harry Hawker mated with a parasol wing. The Swallow was powered by a 110hp (82 kW) Le Rhone 9J air-cooled nine-cylinder rotary engine and carried the standard armament of twin 0.303 in (7.7 mm) fixed forward-firing, synchronised Vickers machine guns.

Flown for the first time in September 1918, the Swallow (serial number B9276) was delivered to Martlesham Heath for official trials by the RFC on October 29, 1918, remaining there until May 1919. The prototype had several fuel system problems which delayed the trials until after the war ended. The lackluter performance of the Swallow during the trails at Martlesham convinced the Royal Flying Corps that the design did not warrant further development, and the prototype was scrapped.

Sopwith Swallow
  • Type: Monoplane Fighter
  • Built By: Boulton & Paul
  • Converted By: Harry Hawker
  • First Flight: September 1918
  • Flight Trails: October 29, 1918-May 1919
  • Based On: F.1 Sopwith Camel
  • Number Built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1 × Le Rhone 9J nine-cylinder rotary engine, 110hp (82 kW)
  • Wingspan: 29 ft 10 in (8.79 m)
  • Wing Area: 159.95 ft² (14.86 m²)
  • Length: 19 ft 9 in (5.72 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 2 in (3.10 m)
  • Empty Weight: 403 kg 888 lb
  • Take-off Weight: 1420 lb (644 kg)
  • Max. Speed: 182 km/h 113 mph
  • Crew: One
  • Armament: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) fixed forward-firing, synchronised Vickers machine guns

References

  1. Virtual Aircraft Museum Sopwith Swallow 1918 : "http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/sopwith_swallow.php"
  2. The-Blueprints.com, Sopwith Swallow 1918 "http://www.the-blueprints.com/.../ww1.../sopwith_swallow_1918"
  3. "Windsock Datafile Specials" Volume 14 No. 4 - July/Aug 1998 Albatros Productions "http://www.windsockdatafilespecials.co.uk/volume-14-no-4---julyaug-1998-62-p.asp"

Westland Wagtail

Westland Wagtail
Westland Wagtail

The Westland Wagtail was a prototype British Fighter aircraft of the First World War. A single engined tractor biplane, the Wagtail was a failure owing to the unreliability of its engine, only five being built.

The Westland Wagtail was designed by Westland Aircraft of Yeovil in 1917 to meet the Royal Air Force Specification IA for a light fighter with superior performance to the Sopwith Camel. Westland's design team, lead by Robert Bruce, the Company's manager and Arthur Davenport, Chief Draughtsman, came up with a design for a small single bay biplane, powered (like the other competitors for the Specification, the BAT Bantam and the Sopwith Snail) by the 170 hp (127 kW) ABC Wasp radial engine. The Wagtail was of conventional wood and fabric construction, with the upper wing centre-section having a large cut-out to improve the pilot's view, and carrying an armament of two Vickers machine guns mounted over the nose.
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Westland Wagtail-Second prototype
  • Role: Fighter
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Westland Aircraft
  • Designed By: Westland Aircraft design team lead by Robert Bruce and Arthur Davenport
  • First Flight: April 1918
  • Status: Prototype
  • Number Built: 5
  • Powerplant: 1× ABC Wasp 7-cylinder radial engine, 170 hp (127 kW)
  • Wingspan: 23 ft 2 in (7.06 m)
  • Wing Area: 190 ft² (17.7 m²)
  • Airfoil: RAF 15
  • Length: 18 ft 11 in (5.77 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 0 in (2.44 m)
  • Empty Weight: 746 lb (339 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,330 lb (605 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 125 mph (109 knots, 201 km/h) at 10,000 ft (3,050 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 20,000 ft (6,100 m)
  • Wing Loading: lb/ft² (kg/m²)
  • Power/Mass: hp/lb (W/kg)
  • Endurance: 2½ hours
  • Climb to: 17,000 ft (5,200 m) 17 min
  • Crew: One
  • Armament: 2× forward firing, synchronised .303 in Vickers machine guns

References

  1. From Wikipedia Westland Wagtail, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Westland_Wagtail"
  2. Bruce, J.M. "British Aeroplanes 1914-18". London:Putnam, 1957, p.709.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "War Planes of the First World War: Fighters Volume One". London:Macdonald, 1969, pp.132–133, p.135. ISBN 356 01490 8.
  4. James, Derek N. "Westland Aircraft since 1915". London:Putnam, 1991, pp.74–77, pp.79-80. ISBN 0 85177 847 X.
  5. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, USA:Naval Institute Press, 1992, pp.133–134. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.