A floatplane has slender pontoons mounted under the fuselage. Two floats are common, but other configurations are possible. Only the "floats" of a floatplane normally come into contact with water. The fuselage remains above water. Some small land aircraft can be modified to become float planes and in general floatplanes are small aircraft. Floatplanes are limited by their ability to handle wave heights typically greater than 12 inches (0.31 m). These float pontoons add to the empty weight of the airplane, and to the drag coefficient, resulting in reduced payload capacity, slower rate-of-climb and slower cruise speed.

Central Powers Float-planes 1914

Friedrichshafen FF.33

Friedrichshafen FF.33e
Friedrichshafen FF.33e - 1917
Friedrichshafen FF.39
Friedrichshafen FF.39 - 1917

The Friedrichshafen FF.33 was a German single-engined amphibious reconnaissance biplane designed by Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen in 1914.

The initial production version was powered by a Mercedes D.II engine inline water-cooled engine, six examples of this variant were built. The basic design was refined and improved. The FF.33e main production reconnaissance variant was powered by a Benz B.III inline engine. This version had longer twin floats, and the under tail central float was eliminated. A radio transmitter replaced its armament, aproximately 180 examples of the FF.33e variant were built.
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Friedrichshafen FF.33
  • Type: Fighter
  • Country: Germany
  • Manufacturer: Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen GmbH
  • First Flight: 1914
  • Entered Service: 1914
  • Primary User: Kaiserliche Marine
  • Number Built:
    • FF.33E: 180
    • FF.33L: 135
  • Powerplant:
    • FF.33E: 1 × Benz Bz.III inline engine, 150 hp (112 kW)
    • FF.39: 1 × Benz Bz.IV, inline water-cooled engine, 200 hp (150 kW)
  • Length:
    • FF.33e: 33 ft 6 in (10.22 m)
    • FF.33l: 29ft 3½ in (8.92 m)
  • Wingspan:
    • FF.33e: 54 ft 6 in (16.60 m)
    • FF.33l: 43 ft 4 in (13.2m)
  • Height: 12 ft 4 in (3.75 m)
  • Max Takeoff Weight:
    • FF.33e: 3,412 lb (1,550 kg)
    • FF.33l: 2,458 lb (1,115 kg)
  • Maximum Speed:
    • FF.33e: 68 mph (112 km/h)
    • FF.33l: 81 mph (130 km/h.)
  • Endurance: 4-5 hours
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: FF.33l
    • Guns: 1 × flexible 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 in rear cockpit
    • Bombs: 8 × 26.4 lb (12 kg)

References

  1. Friedrichshafen FF.33. (2010, August 15). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:57, August 29, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Friedrichshafen_FF.33&oldid=379054818
  2. Timo Heinonen. Thulinista Hornetiin - 75 vuotta Suomen ilmavoimien lentokoneita. Tikkakoski: Keski-Suomen ilmailumuseo. (1992) ISBN 9519568824.

Central Powers Float-planes 1916

Albatros W.IV

Albatros W.IV - 1916  Albatros W.IV - 1916
Albatros W.4 Seaplane

The Albatros W.IV was a German floatplane version of the D.II with new wing and tail surfaces. Albatros Flugzeugwerke built 128 examples (including one prototype) between June 1916 and December 1917. The first test flight for the prototype (No 747) was in June 1916. The Albatros W.IV served with the Kaiserliche Marine, operating in the North Sea and Baltic theatres of war and later as trainers.
[Read more]

Albatros W.IV
  • Type: Floatplane Biplane Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Albatros Flugzeugwerke
  • First Flight: 1916
  • Number Built: 128
  • Primary User: Kaiserliche Marine
  • Developed From: Albatros D.II
  • Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.III, inline water-cooled 160 hp (120 kW)
  • Wingspan: 31 ft 2 in (9.50 m)
  • Height: 12 ft 2 in (3.7 m)
  • Length: 27 ft 11 in (8.50 m)
  • Wing area: 340 ft² (31.6 m²)
  • Empty weight: 1,740 lb (790 kg)
  • Gross weight: 2,360 lb (1,070 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 100 mph (160 km/h)
  • Range: 280 miles (450 km)
  • Service ceiling: 9,840 ft (3,000 m)
  • Rate of climb: 650 ft/min (3.3 m/s)
  • Crew: one pilot
  • Armament: 1 or 2 × forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine guns

References

  1. Albatros W.4. (2010, May 4). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:48, August 29, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Albatros_W.4&oldid=360031523
  2. Green, W. & Swanborough, G. (1994). "The Complete Book of Fighters". London: Salamander Books. ISBN 1-85833-777-1
  3. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions. p. 56.

Friedrichshafen FF.43

Friedrichshafen FF.43
Friedrichshafen FF.43 - 1916

The Friedrichshafen FF.43 was a German single-seat floatplane fighter of the 1910s produced by Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen.

Designed for defence of the floatplane bases, the FF.43 was a biplane powered by a Mercedes D.III inline piston engine driving a tractor propeller. It was armed with two 7.92 mm (0.312 in) LMG 08/15 forward-firing machine guns. Only one aircraft was built.

Friedrichshafen FF.43
  • Role: Floatplane fighter
  • Manufacturer: Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen
  • First flight: 8 September 1916
  • Number built: 1
  • Powerplant: Mercedes D.IIIa, water cooled 6 cylinder in-line, 160 hp (120 kW)
  • Wingspan: 9.92 m (32 ft 6 in)
  • Wing area: 31.0 m² (334 ft²)
  • Length: 8.55 m (28 ft 1 in)
  • Height: 3.35 m (11 ft 0 in)
  • Empty weight: 798 kg (1,759 lb)
  • Gross weight: 1,078 kg (2,377 lb)
  • Maximum speed: 163 km/h (102 mph)
  • Range: 400 km (249 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 3,000 m (9,840 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 2.8 m/s (551 ft/min)
  • Crew: One pilot
  • Armament: 2 × fixed, forward-firing 7.92 mm (.312 in) LMG 08/15 machine guns

References

  1. Friedrichshafen FF.43. (2010, September 20). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 21:47, February 12, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Friedrichshafen_FF.43&oldid=385843959
  2. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing.
  3. Borzutzki, Siegfried (1993). Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen GmbH: Diplom-Ingenieur Theodor Kober. Berlin: KÖnigswinter. pp. 136.

Hansa-Brandenburg KDW

Hansa-Brandenburg KDW - 1916
Hansa-Brandenburg KDW
 Hansa-Brandenburg KDW - 1916
Hansa-Brandenburg KDW

The Hansa-Brandenburg KDW was a German single seat fighter floatplane of World War I. The KDW - Kampf Doppeldecker, Wasser ("Fighter Biplane, Water") - was an adaptation of the Hansa-Brandenburg D.I landplane and was designed to provide coastal defense over the North Sea and Adriatic.
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Hansa-Brandenburg KDW
  • Type: Floatplane fighter
  • Manufacturer: Hansa und Brandenburgische Flugzeug-Werke
  • Designed by: Ernst Heinkel
  • Introduction: 1916
  • Number built: ˜60
  • Developed from: Hansa-Brandenburg D.I
  • Powerplant: 1× Benz Bz.III water-cooled inline engine, 150 hp (112 kW)
  • Length: 26 ft 3 in (8 m)
  • Wingspan: 30 ft 4 in (9.25 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 0 in (3.35 m)
  • Loaded weight: 2,293 lb (1,040 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 93 kn, 107 mph (172 km/h) at sea level
  • Service ceiling: 13,123 ft (4,000 m)
  • Endurance: 2 hrs 30 mins
  • Crew: one, pilot
  • Armament: 1 or 2 × Schwarzlose MG M.07/12 fixed forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) machine guns

References

  1. Hansa-Brandenburg KDW. (2009, November 8). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 14:39, August 22, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hansa-Brandenburg_KDW&oldid=324698708
  2. Jackson, Robert, "The Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft", Parragon, 2002. ISBN 0-75258-130-9

Rumpler-6B

Rumpler 6B - 1916
Rumpler 6B

Rumpler 6B was a German single-engine floatplane fighter with biplane wing structure, designed and built by Rumpler Flugzeugwerke, in Berlin Johannisthal and introduced in 1916.

Born out of requirement of the Kaiserliche Marine (Imperial Navy) for a seaplane fighter, the Rumpler 6B, was, like its contemporaries Albatros W.4 and Hansa-Brandenburg W.9, an adaptation of an existing landplane design. In Rumpler's case the new floatplane fighter was based on company's two-seat C.I reconnaissance aircraft. The modifications included adding forward stagger to wings, removal of the second (observer's) cockpit and fitting a larger rudder to offset the increased side area caused by the addition of floats. In the production aircraft, the area of horizontal tail surfaces was also slightly reduced. The armament consisted of a fixed, forward-firing 7.92 mm (.312 in) LMG 08/15 "Spandau" machine gun mounted on port side of the engine block.
[Read more]

Rumpler 6B-1
  • Type: Floatplane fighter
  • National Origin: German Empire
  • Manufacturer: Rumpler Flugzeugwerke
  • First flight: 1916
  • Introduced: 1916
  • Retired: 1920s
  • Primary Users:
    • German Air Force
    • Finnish Air Force
    • Bulgarian Navy
  • Produced: 1916 - 1918
  • Number built: 88
  • Developed from: Rumpler C.I
  • Powerplant: 1× Mercedes D.III 6-cylinder, liquid cooled inline engine, 160 hp (120 kW)
  • Wingspan: 39 ft 6 in (12.05 m)
  • Wing area: 387.5 ft² 36.00 m²()
  • Length: 30 ft 10 in (9.40 m)
  • Maximum Takeoff Weight: 2,513 lb (1,140 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 83 kn, 95 mph (153 km/h)
  • Service ceiling: 16,400 ft (5,000 m)
  • Range: 4 hours (of flying time)
  • Crew: One, pilot
  • Armament: 1 × fixed, forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 with an interruptor gear

References

  1. Rumpler 6B. (2010, August 15). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 09:45, August 17, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Rumpler_6B&oldid=379054154
  2. Y.Milanov: "The aviation in Bulgaria in the wars from 1912 to 1945", Vol.I. Sveti Gueorgui Pobedonosetz, Sofia, 1995 (in Bulgarian)
  3. Munson, Kenneth - "Fighters, Attack and Training Aircraft 1914 - 1919 ISBN 0 7537 0916 3
  4. Keskinen, Kalevi; Partonen, Kyösti and Stenman, Kari: "Suomen Ilmavoimat I 1918-27", 2005. ISBN 952-99432-2-9.
  5. Keskinen, Kalevi; Stenman, Kari and Niska, Klaus: "Suomen ilmavoimien lentokoneet 1918-1939", Tietoteos, 1976.

Central Powers Float-planes 1917

Friedrichshafen FF.41

Friedrichshafen FF.41 - 1917
Friedrichshafen FF.41 - 1917
Friedrichshafen FF.41AT - 1917
Friedrichshafen FF.41AT - 1917

The Friedrichshafen FF.41 was a large, German-built, three-seat, twin-engine amphibious reconnaissance aircraft designed by Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen in 1917.

The aircraft was mainly used as a reconnaissance aircraft, but also as a bomber and as a mine-laying aircraft. A torpedo-carrying version, the FF.41AT, was also developed. It had a modified fuselage and a single vertical fin (in comparison to the basic model's three). Only five FF.41AT aircraft were manufactured.
[Read more]

Friedrichshafen FF.41
  • Role: Reconnaissance
  • National Origin: Germany
  • Manufacturer: Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen GmbH
  • First flight: 1917
  • Introduced: 1917
  • Primary users:
    • Kaiserliche Marine
    • Finnish Air Force
    • Estonian Air Force
  • Number built: 9
  • Developed from: Friedrichshafen FF.35
  • Powerplant: 2× Benz Bz.III 6-cylinder, water-cooled inline, 150 hp (112 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 72 ft (21.96 m)
  • Wing area: 1,210.5 ft² (112.5 m²)
  • Length: 44 ft 11 in (13.70 m)
  • Height: 15 ft 3 in (4.65 m)
  • Max takeoff weight: 7,340 lb (3,670 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 65 kn, 74 mph (120 km/h)
  • Endurance: 6 hours
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1 × 7.92 mm (.312 in) machine gun
    • Bombs: 1 × 700 kg (1,540 lb) torpedo

References

  1. Friedrichshafen FF.41a http://forum.valka.cz/viewtopic.php/title/Friedrichshafen-FF-41a/p/296642#296642
  2. Friedrichshafen FF.41. (2011, February 2). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 03:03, February 18, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Friedrichshafen_FF.41&oldid=411494684
  3. Timo Heinonen (1992). Thulinista Hornetiin - 75 vuotta Suomen ilmavoimien lentokoneita. Tikkakoski: Keski-Suomen ilmailumuseo. ISBN 9519568824.
  4. Kroschel, G. Stützer, H.: Die deutschen Militärflugzeuge 1910 - 1918, Weltbild Verlag, Augsburg 1994, ISBN 3-89350-693-4
  5. Borzutski Siegfried: Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen GmbH. Markus Burbach Verlag, Berlin 1993, ISBN 3-92751-360-1
  6. Gray, Peter, Thetford, Peter: German Aircraft Of The First World War. Doubleday, Garden City, 1970
  7. Lambert M. Tennoe, Mariam T. Henssonow, Susan F. Surhone (Author) Friedrichshafen FF.41. Betascript Publishing (2010) ISBN-10: 6132353437, ISBN-13: 978-6132353436

Hansa-Brandenburg W.12

Hansa-Brandenburg W.I2 - 1917
Hansa-Brandenburg W.12
Hansa-Brandenburg W.I2 - 1917
Hansa-Brandenburg W.12 s/n

The Hansa-Brandenburg W.12 was a German biplane fighter floatplane of World War I. It was a development of Ernst Heinkel's previous KDW, adding a rear cockpit for an observer/gunner, and had an unusual inverted tailplane (which instead of standing up from the fuselage, hung below it) in order to give an uninterrupted field of fire. The aircraft's first flight was in early 1917.
[Read more]

Hansa-Brandenburg W.12
  • Type: Floatplane fighter
  • Manufacturer: Hansa-Brandenburg
  • Designed by: Ernst Heinkel
  • First Flight: Early 1917
  • Primary Users:
    • Kaiserliche Marine
    • Marine-Luchtvaartdienst
  • Number Built: 181
  • Length: 31 ft 6 in (9.60 m)
  • Wingspan: 36 ft 9 in (11.20 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 10 in (3.30 m)
  • Wing Area: 389.5 ft² (36.20 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 2,193 lb (997 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 3,206 lb (1,454 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1× Mercedes D.III 6-cylinder inline engine, 160 hp (119 kW)
  • Maximum Speed: 99 mph (160 km/h)
  • Range: 320 mi (520 km)
  • Service Ceiling: 16,405 ft (5,000 m)
  • Endurance: 3 hrs 30 mins
  • Crew: Two
  • Armament:
    • 1 or 2 × fixed forward 7.92 (0.312 in) LMG 08/15 machine guns
    • 1 × 7.92 (0.312 in) Parabellum MG14 in rear cockpit

References

  1. Hansa-Brandenburg W.12. (2010, August 29). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 22:01, August 29, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hansa-Brandenburg_W.12&oldid=381690563
  2. Jackson, Robert, "The Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft", Parragon, 2002. ISBN 0-75258-130-9

Central Powers Float-planes 1918

Hansa-Brandenburg W.29

Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 - 1918
Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 s/n 2516
Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 - 1918
Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 - 1918

The Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 was a German monoplane fighter floatplane manufactured by Hansa und Brandenburgische Flugzeug-Werke, which served in 1918 in the closing months of World War I. The Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 had its first flight on March 27, 1918. The fighter was deployed from bases on the North Sea coast.
[Read more]

Hansa-Brandenburg W.29
  • Type: Floatplane fighter
  • Country: Germany
  • Manufacturer: Hansa und Brandenburgische Flugzeug-Werke
  • Designed By: Ernst Heinkel
  • First Flight: 27 March 1918
  • Entered Service: 1918
  • Powerplant: 1 × Benz Bz.III 6-cylinder water-cooled inline engine, 150 hp (112 kW)
  • Wingspan: 44 ft 4 in (13.50 m)
  • Wing area: 348 ft² (32.2 m²)
  • Length: 30 ft 8 in (9.38 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 11 in (3.00 m)
  • Empty Weight: 2,200 lb (1,000 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 3,285 lb (1,494 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 95 kn, 109 mph (175 km/h)
  • Range: 281 nmi, 320 mi (520 km)
  • Service Ceiling: 16,400 ft (5,000 m)
  • Endurance: 4 hrs
  • Climb to: 1,000 m (3,280 ft) 6 min
  • Crew: Two
  • Armament:
    • 1 or 2 × fixed, forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine guns
    • 1 × flexible 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 in rear cockpit

References

  1. Hansa-Brandenburg W.29. (2009, November 8). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 22:04, August 29, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hansa-Brandenburg_W.29&oldid=324701281
  2. Jackson, Robert, "The Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft", Parragon, 2002. ISBN 0-75258-130-9
  3. Gray, Peter and Thetford, Owen. "German Aircraft of the First World War". London: Putnam, 1962.

Hansa-Brandenburg W.33

Hansa-Brandenburg W.33 - 1918
Hansa-Brandenburg W.33

Hansa-Brandenburg W.33 was a German two-seat, low-wing single-engined seaplane, which had been designed by Hansa und Brandenburgische Flugzeugwerke in the 1920s. Although the W.33 was built in relatively small numbers, the design was widely recognized as successful and numerous copies and license built versions were built by the hundreds after World War I.

The Hansa-Brandenburg W.33 aircraft was designed in 1916 by Ernst Heinkel and entered German service in 1918. 26 aircraft were built of this design, but only six before the collapse of the German empire. Noticeably superior to the FF.33L, it proved to be an excellent aircraft. The Hansa-Brandenburg monoplanes considerably influenced German seaplane design; several copies appeared in 1918, such as the Friedrichshafen FF.63, the Dornier Cs-I, the Junkers J.11, and the L.F.G. Roland ME 8. After the war a version of the W.29 was used by Denmark, while Finland obtained a license for to manufacture of the W.33.
[Read more]

Hansa-Brandenburg W.33
  • Role: Reconnaissance seaplane
  • Manufacturer: Hansa und Brandenburgische Flugzeugwerke
  • Designed By: Ernst Heinkel
  • Primary users: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Finnish Air Force
  • Number Built: aproximately 187
  • Length: 36 ft 5 in (11.10 m)
  • Wingspan: 52 ft 0 in (15.85 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 1 in (3.37 m)
  • Empty weight: 3,080 lb (1,400 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 4,673 lb (2,124 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Fiat A.12bis inline engine, 300 hp (224 kW)
  • Maximum speed: 86 kn, 99 mph (160 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 83 kn, 95 mph (154 km/h)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament:
    • Pilot: 2 × fixed, forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 machine guns
    • Observer: 1 × flexible 0.312 in (7.92 mm) Parabellum MG14 in rear cockpit

References

  1. Hansa-Brandenburg W.33. (2010, December 3). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 11:56, January 8, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hansa-Brandenburg_W.33&oldid=400370370
  2. Hansa-Brandenburg W.33 1918 Virtual Aircraft Museum Retrieved 12:15, January 8, 2011, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/germany/brandenburg_w33.php
  3. W.Green, D.Swanborough The Complete Book of Fighters, 2000
  4. Keskinen, Kalevi; Niska, Klaus; Stenman, Kari; Geust, Carl-Fredrik: Suomen museolentokoneet, Forssan kirjapaino, 1981, ISBN 951-9035-60-5.

Zeppelin-Lindau (Dornier) CS I

 Zeppelin-Lindau (Dornier) CS.I s/n 8502 - 1918
Zeppelin-Lindau (Dornier) CS.I s/n 8502 - 1918
 Zeppelin-Lindau (Dornier) CS.I Front mounted radiator - 1918
Zeppelin-Lindau CS.I Front mounted radiator

This experimental two-seat seaplane was built during 1918. It was of all-metal construction except for the fabric-covered wing and cruciform tail surfaces.

Ailerons were fitted with Flettner-type servos. The machine was fitted with vee-type eight-cylinder Benz engine. Both nose and side radiator installations were tested.

Zeppelin-Lindau (Dornier) CS I
  • Role: Experimental Seaplane
  • Nation of Origin: German Empire
  • Manufacturer: Zeppelin-Werke Lindau GMBH
  • Designed By: Claude Dornier at Luftschiffbau Zeppelin GmbH
  • Number Built: Unknown
  • Status: Prototype Only
  • Powerplant: 1 × Benz Bz IIIbo 8 cylinder liquid cooled V engine, 195 hp (145 kW)
  • Wing Span: 43 ft. 2 ⅞ in. (13.18 m.).
  • Wing Area: 322 ft² (29.8 m²).
  • Empty Weight: 2,112 lb (960 kg).
  • Loaded Weight: 3,254 lb (1,479 kg).
  • Speed: 93.75 mph (150 kmh)
  • Crew: Two
  • Armament:
    • Gun - Pilot: 2 × forward-firing 0.312 in (7.92 mm) "Spandau" LMG 08/15 machine guns
    • Gun - Observer: 1 × 0.312 in (7.92 mm) trainable Parabellum MG14 machine gun for observer

References

  1. Zeppelin-Lindau (Dornier) CS.I(2012, August 10). In Myflyingmachines. Retrieved 22:34, August 11, 2012, from http://flyingmachines.ru/Site2/Crafts/Craft30303.htm
  2. Gray, Peter; Thetford, Owen (1962). German Aircraft of the First World War (First edition ed.). London: Putnam.