Caudron G.6

Caudron G.6 - 1916
Caudron G.6

The first prototype flew in July 1916. A total of 512 aircraft were built.

The only feature distinguishing the Caudron G.6 from the G.4 was the former's conventional fuselage, which replaced the latter's apparently inadequate twin lattice booms for supporting the tailplane.

The Caudron G.6 was a French reconnaissance aircraft of World War I. It married the wings and engine layout of the unorthodox Caudron G.4 to an all-new fuselage of conventional design. Over 500 of these aircraft were used by the French military for reconnaissance and artillery-spotting duties in 1917 and 1918.

Caudron G.6
  • Type: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • Country of Origin: France
  • Manufacturer: Caudron
  • Designed By: Paul Deville
  • First Flight: 1916
  • Primary User: Aviation Militaire
  • Number Built: 512
  • Powerplant: 2 × Le Rhône 9, 130 hp (97 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 56 ft 6 in (17.22 m)
  • Length: 28 ft 3 in (8.60 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 8 in (2.95 m)
  • Empty Weight: 2,072 lb (940 kg)
  • Gross Weight: 3,164 lb (1,435 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 196 mph (50 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 15,500 ft (4,725 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 866 ft/min (4.4 m/s)
  • Range: 224 miles (360 km)
  • Endurance: 2 hours 30 min
  • Crew: Two, pilot and observer
  • Armament:
  • Guns: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7mm) Lewis machine guns in flexible mount for observer
  • Bombs: up to 100 kg (220 lb) of bombs carried externally

References

  1. Caudron G.6. (2009, March 17). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 14:45, August 8, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Caudron_G.6&oldid=277927029
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. pp. 240.
  3. World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 891 Sheet 17.

Salmson-Moineau

Salmson-Moineau S.M.1
Salmson-Moineau S.M.1

The Salmson-Moineau or Salmson-Moineau S.M.1 was a French armed three-seat biplane long range reconnaissance aircraft of the First World War designed by René Moineau for the Salmson company.

The S.M.1 was developed from 1915 to meet the French military A3 specification, which called for a three-seat long range reconnaissance aircraft with strong defensive armament. The S.M.1 was unconventional, powered by a single Salmson 9A liquid-cooled radial engine mounted in the fuselage powering two airscrews mounted between the wings with a system of gears and drive shafts. This layout was chosen by Moineau to minimise drag. The twin airscrew layout allowed a wide field of fire for the two gunner-observers, one seated in the nose and one behind the pilot. Both gunners operated ring-mounted flexible 37 mm APX cannon built by the Puteaux arsenal. The airframe itself was relatively conventional, the boxy fuselage mounted on a system of struts between the wings. The undercarriage included a nose wheel, intended solely to prevent the aircraft nosing over, and a tail skid.
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Salmson-Moineau SM1
  • Type: three-seat biplane long range reconnaissance aircraft
  • National Origin: France
  • Designed by: René Moineau
  • Manufacturer: Salmson-Moineau company.
  • Designed: 1915
  • First Flight: early 1916
  • In Use: 1916-1918
  • Retired From Service: 1917
  • Number Built: around 155
  • Powerplant: 1 × Salmson P-9 150 hp
  • Wingspan: 17.47 m
  • Wing Area: 70.00 m²
  • Length: 10.00 m
  • Height: 3.80 m
  • Loaded Weight: 2050 kg
  • Maximum Speed: 130 km/h / at 2000 m
  • Climb Rate: 2000 m in 20 min 20 sec
  • Crew: 3
  • Armament:
  • 2 × ring-mounted flexible 37 mm APX cannon
  • or
  • 2 × 7.62-mm machine gun Lewis, lightweight bombs

References

  1. Davilla, James J., & Soltan, Arthur M., French Aircraft of the First World War. Stratford, Connecticut: Flying Machines Press, 1997. ISBN 0-9637110-4-0