British AviationBritish Roundel

Martinsyde G.100/G.102 "Elephant"

Martinsyde G.100
Martinsyde G.100 - 1916

The G100 was built originally as a long range, single-seat fighter and escort machine but on the basis of its size and weight was reclassified as a day bomber. It successfully performed this role from the summer of 1916 through to the closing weeks of 1917. It was also used for long-range photo reconnaissance, where stability and endurance were required (the type was capable of a five and a half hour flight) .

Variants

Martinsyde G.100/G.102 "Elephant"
  • Type: Biplane fighter/Bomber
  • Manufacturer: Martinsyde
  • Entered Service: 1916
  • Number Built: 271
  • Powerplant: 1 × Beardmore straight 6-cylinder engine, 120 hp (90 kW)
  • Wingspan: 38 ft 0 in (11.59 m)
  • Wing Area: 410 ft² (38.1 m²)
  • Length: 26 ft 6 in (8.07 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 8 in (2.95 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,795 lb (816 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,424 lb (1,102 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 83 knots (96 mph, 155 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 14,000 ft (4270 m)
  • Crew: One, pilot
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis gun mounted above upper wing centre section
    • Guns: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis gun mounted fixed aft of the cockpit pointing rearwards
    • Bombs: 260 lb (120 kg) bomb load

References

  1. From Wikipedia Martinsyde G.100, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martinsyde_G.100"
  2. "http://www.theaerodrome.com/aircraft/gbritain/martinsyde_g100.php"
  3. "http://www.britishaircraft.co.uk/aircraftpage.phpID=721"
  4. Mason, Francis K (1992). "The British Fighter since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press. pp. Pages 44–45. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  5. Cutlack, F.M. (1941) [1923]. "Appendix 1 Types of Fighting Aeroplanes". "The Official History of Australia in the War of 1914 - 1918: Volume VIII: The Australian Flying Corps in the Western and Eastern Theatres of War 1914-1918" (11th Edition ed.). Sydney: Angus and Robertson. pp. Page 404.
  6. Mason, Francis K (1994). "The British Bomber since 1914". London: Putnam Aeronautical Books. p. Pages74-75. ISBN 0 85177 861 5.
  7. "Aircraft of World War I", Kenneth Munson, 1967 Ian Allan ISBN 0-7110-0356-4

Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8

RAF FE.8 - 1916
Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8 - 1916

The Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8 was one of the final pusher type aircraft developed for the war. It was considered a slow and not a particularly nimble aircraft design. There were not many in active service, and was superceded by more modern fighter/scouts.

Like the D.H.2, the F.E.8 was designed as a pusher in order to provide a forward firing machine gun mount at a time when no synchronization gear was available to the Allies to safely arm a tractor aircraft in the same way. Although a clean and well designed little aeroplane, for a pusher – it could not escape the drag penalty imposed by its tail structure and was no match for the Halberstadt and Albatros fighters of late 1916.

The new fighter was not a great improvement on the D.H.2 – although a little faster it did not handle quite so well. It was nonetheless ordered into production from Darracq Motors and Vickers. Neither manufacturer delivered their F.E.8s particularly quickly, so that the type ended up reaching the front in numbers six months later than the D.H.2.
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Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8
  • Type: Pusher biplane fighter
  • Manufacturer: Royal Aircraft Factory, Darracq Motors, Vickers
  • Designed By: J. Kenworthy
  • First Flight: September 1915
  • Introduced: August 2, 1916
  • Primary User: Royal Flying Corps
  • Number Built: 295
  • Powerplant: 1× Le Rhône nine-cylinder air-cooled rotary engine, 110 hp. (82 kW)
  • Wingspan: 31 ft 6 in (9.6 m)
  • Wing Area: 218 ft² (20.25 m²)
  • Length: 23ft 8 in (7.21 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 2 in (2.8 m)
  • Empty Weight: 960 lb (406 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,470 lb (668 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 93.6 mph (151 km/h, 81 knots)
  • Service Ceiling: 14,500 ft (4,420 m)
  • Climb to 6,000 ft: (1,830 m)8 min 20 sec
  • Endurance: 2.5 hours (Monosoupape engine)
  • Crew: One
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1× 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis gun
    • Bombs: Light bombs

References

  1. From Wikipedia Royal Aircraft Factory F.E.8, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Aircraft_Factory_F.E.8"
  2. Bruce, J.M. "Warplanes of the First World War: Volume 2 Fighters". London: Macdonald, 1968. ISBN 0-356-01473-8.
  3. Cheesman, E.F. (ed.) "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War" Letchworth: Harleyford, 1960
  4. Taylor, John W.R. "F.E.8. Combat Aircraft of the World from 1909 to the Present". New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1969. ISBN 0-425-03633-2.

Sopwith Pup

Sopwith Pup
Sopwith Pup - 1916
Sopwith Pup- 1916
Sopwith Pup - 1916

The Sopwith Pup quickly became a favorite with pilots of the Royal Naval Air Service. It was superior to the Fokker D.III and more than a match for any of the new Halberstadt and Albatros scouts. Armed with a single synchronous machine gun, it was lighter and less dangerous than it's successor, the Sopwith Camel.

Although underpowered, pilots liked the plane because it was maneuverable and fast. It could climb and hold its altitude better than any other fighter. In August 1917, the Sopwith Pup was the first aircraft to land aboard a moving ship, the Royal Navy's H.M.S. Furious.

In 1915, Sopwith produced the SLTBP, a personal aircraft for the company's test pilot, Harry Hawker. The SLTBP was a single-seat, tractor biplane powered by a 50 hp Gnome rotary engine. Sopwith next developed a larger fighter that was heavily influenced by the SLTBP.
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Sopwith Pup
  • Type: Biplane fighter
  • Manufacturer: Sopwith Aviation Company
  • Designed By: Herbert Smith
  • First Flight: February 1916
  • Introduced: October 1916
  • Primary Users:
    • Royal Flying Corps
    • Royal Air Force
    • Royal Naval Air Service
  • Produced: 1916-1918
  • Number built: 1,770
  • Variants:
    • Alcock Scout
    • Beardmore W.B.III
  • Powerplant: 1× Le Rhône air-cooled rotary engine, 80 hp (60 kW)
  • Wingspan: 26 ft 6 in (8.08 m)
  • Wing Area: 254 ft² (23.6 m²)
  • Length: 19 ft 3¾ in (5.89 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 5 in (2.87 m)
  • Empty Weight: 787 lb (358 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,225 lb (557 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 97 knots (111½ mph, 180 km/h) at sea level
  • Service Ceiling: 17,500 feet (5,600 m)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Climb to: 10,000 ft (3,050 m) 14 min
  • Climb to: 16,100 ft (4,910 m) 35 min
  • Crew: one
  • Armament: 1× 0.303 (7.7 mm) forward-firing Vickers gun

References

  1. Bruce, J.M. "The Sopwith Pup: Historic Military Aircraft No 6". Flight, 1 January 1954, pp. 8-12.
  2. Bruce, J.M. "The Sopwith Pup". Aircraft in Profile, Volume 1/Part 2. Windsor, Berkshire, UK: Profile Publications Ltd., 1965 (4th revised edition 1976). ISBN 0-85383-411-3.
  3. Bruce, J.M., Gordon Page and Ray Sturtivant. "The Sopwith Pup". Tunbridge Wells, Kent, UK: Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd., 2002. ISBN 0-85130-310-2.
  4. Franks, Norman and Harry Dempsey. "Sopwith Pup Aces of World War I" (Aircraft of the Aces). London: Osprey Publishing, 2005. ISBN 1-84176-886-3.
  5. Robertson, Bruce. "Sopwith – The Man and His Aircraft". London: Harleyford, 1970. ISBN 0-90043-515-1.
  6. Thetford, Owen. "British Naval Aircraft since 1912". London: Putnam, Fourth edition 1978. ISBN 0-370-30021-1.
  7. Winchester, Jim, ed. "Sopwith Pup Naval Fighter". Biplanes, Triplanes and Seaplanes (Aviation Factfile). London: Grange Books plc, 2004. ISBN 1-84013-641-3.

Sopwith Triplane

Sopwith Triplane- 1916
Sopwith Triplane - 1916
Sopwith Triplane- 1916
Sopwith Triplane - 1916

The Sopwith Triplane was used in combat by the Royal Naval Air Service. The stack of three wings reduced wingspan and increased wing area making it handle and climb better than biplanes. Visibility from the cockpit was outstanding but it was slower and less heavily armed than it's German opponents.
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Sopwith Triplane
  • Type: Fighter
  • National Origin: Britain
  • Manufacturer: Sopwith Aviation Company
  • Designed By: Herbert Smith
  • First Flight:28 May 1916
  • Entered Service:late 1916
  • Retired December 1917
  • Primary User: Royal Naval Air Service
  • Number Built:147
  • Powerplant: Le Rhône 9B, air-cooled 9 cylinder rotary 130 hp. (97 kW)
  • Wingspan: 26 ft 6 in (8 m)
  • Length: 18 ft 10 in (5.73 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 6 in (3.2 m)
  • Empty Weight: 993 lb (450 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,415 lb (642 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 117 mph (187 km/h) at 5,000 ft (1,830 m)
  • Service Ceiling: 20,500 ft (6,250 m)
  • Range: 280 mi (450 km)
  • Endurance: 2 hrs 45 min
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1× 0.303 (7.7 mm) forward-firing Vickers gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Sopwith Triplane, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sopwith_Triplane"
  2. Bowers, Peter M. and Ernest R. McDowell. "Triplanes: A Pictorial History of the World's Triplanes and Multiplanes". St. Paul, Minnesota: Motorbooks International, 1993. ISBN 0-87938-614-2.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "Sopwith Triplane" (Windsock Datafile 22). Berkhamsted, Herts, UK: Albatros Productions, 1990. ISBN 0-94841-426-X.
  4. Connors, John F. "Sopwith's Flying Staircase." Wings, Volume 5, No. 3, June 1975.
  5. Cooksley, Peter. "Sopwith Fighters in Action" (Aircraft No. 110). Carrollton, Texas: Squadron/Signal Publications, 1991. ISBN 0-89747-256-X.
  6. Davis, Mick. "Sopwith Aircraft. Ramsbury", Marlborough, Wiltshire: Crowood Press, 1999. ISBN 1-86126-217-5.
  7. Franks, Norman. "Sopwith Triplane Aces of World War I" (Aircraft of the Aces No. 62). Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 2004. ISBN 1-84176-728-X.
  8. Hiscock, Melvyn. "Classic Aircraft of World War I" (Osprey Classic Aircraft). Oxford: Osprey Publishing, 1994. ISBN 1-85532-407-5.
  9. Kennett, Lee. "The First Air War: 1914-1918". New York: The Free Press, 1991. ISBN 0-02917-301-9.
  10. Lamberton, W.M., and E.F. Cheesman. "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Letchworth: Harleyford, 1960. ISBN 0-90043-501-1.
  11. Mason, Francis K. "The British Fighter Since 1912". Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1992. ISBN 1-55750-082-7.
  12. Robertson, Bruce. "Sopwith – The Man and His Aircraft". London: Harleyford, 1970. ISBN 0-90043-515-1.
  13. Thetford, Owen. "British Naval Aircraft Since 1912". London: Putnam, 1994. ISBN 0-85177-861-5.

French AviationFrench Roundel

Caudron G.6

Caudron G.6 - 1916
Caudron G.6 - 1916
Caudron G.6 - 1916
Caudron G.6 - 1916

The Caudron G.6 was a French reconnaissance aircraft of World War I. It married the wings and engine layout of the unorthodox Caudron G.4 to an all-new fuselage of conventional design. Over 500 of these aircraft were used by the French military for reconnaissance and artillery-spotting duties in 1917 and 1918.

The first prototype flew in July 1916. A total of 512 aircraft were built. The only feature distinguishing the Caudron G.6 from the G.4 was the former's conventional fuselage, which replaced the latter's apparently inadequate twin lattice booms for supporting the tailplane.

Caudron G.6
  • Type: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • Country of Origin: France
  • Manufacturer: Caudron
  • Designed By: Paul Deville
  • First Flight: 1916
  • Primary User: Aviation Militaire
  • Number Built: 512
  • Powerplant: 2 × Le Rhône 9, 130 hp (97 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 56 ft 6 in (17.22 m)
  • Length: 28 ft 3 in (8.60 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 8 in (2.95 m)
  • Empty Weight: 2,072 lb (940 kg)
  • Gross Weight: 3,164 lb (1,435 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 196 mph (50 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: 15,500 ft (4,725 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 866 ft/min (4.4 m/s)
  • Range: 224 miles (360 km)
  • Endurance: 2 hours 30 min
  • Crew: Two, pilot and observer
  • Armament:
  • Guns: 2 × 0.303 in (7.7mm) Lewis machine guns in flexible mount for observer
  • Bombs: up to 100 kg (220 lb) of bombs carried externally

References

  1. Caudron G.6. (2009, March 17). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 14:45, August 8, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Caudron_G.6&oldid=277927029
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. pp. 240.
  3. World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 891 Sheet 17.

Nieuport 17

Nieuport 17
Nieuport 17 - 1916

Many of the French and British aces began their careers flying the Nieuport 17. The highly maneuverable "Superbébé" was a larger, improved version of the Nieuport 11. Like its predecessor, it was initially equipped with a Lewis gun but was upgraded to a synchronized Vickers machine gun. Helping end Germany's domination of the air war, the Nieuport 17 easily outclimbed and outperformed the Fokker E.III. The superior design was so successful that German high command ordered it copied.

Nieuport 17
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Société Anonyme des Establissements Nieuport
  • First Introduced: March 1916
  • Powerplant: Le Rhône 9J, 9 cylinder air cooled radial, 110 hp. (82 kW)
  • Wing Span: 26 ft 11 in 8.22 m
  • Length: 18 ft 10 in 5.74 m
  • Height: 7 ft 10 in
  • Empty Weight: 827 lb
  • Loaded Weight: 1246 lb 565 kg
  • Maximum Speed: 110 mph 177 kmh
  • Service Ceiling: 17,388 ft 5,300 m
  • Endurance: 2 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) drum-fed Lewis gun and/or 1 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Nieuport 17, "From Wikipedia Nieuport 17"
  2. Bruce, Jack. "Those Classic Nieuports". Air Enthusiast Quarterly. Number Two, 1976. Bromley, UK:Pilot Press. pp. 137-153.
  3. Cheesman E.F., ed. "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918" War. Letchworth, UK: Harleyford Publications, 1960.
  4. Cooksley, Peter. "Nieuport Fighters in Action". Carrollton, Texas: Squadron/Signal Publications, 1997. ISBN 0-89747-377-9.

SPAD S VII

SPAD S-VII 1916
SPAD S VII - 1916

The French Air Service replaced the Nieuport 17 with the SPAD S.VII. Although disadvantaged by poor forward and downward views from the cockpit, the SPAD S.VII was fast, durable and difficult to shoot down. A good performer, it was flown by nearly all the French aces. It proved less successful in the hands of the British, possibly due to the combat tactics employed by the pilots of the Royal Flying Corps. With 18 victories, Irish ace William Cochran-Patrick scored more victories with the SPAD S.VII and SPAD S.XIII than any other ace. The SPAD S.VII in the illustration was flown by the great French ace, Georges Guynemer.

SPAD S VII
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Société Pour L'Aviation et ses Dérivés
  • Designed By: Louis Béchereau
  • First Introduced: September 1916
  • Number Built: 3,825
  • Powerplant: Hispano-Suiza 8A, Water cooled V-8, 150 hp (110 kW)
  • Wing Span: 25 ft 7.75 in 7.82 m
  • Length: 20 ft 2 in 6.15 m
  • Height: 7 ft 6.5 in
  • Empty Weight: 1,102 lb
  • Loaded Weight: 1632 lb 740 kg
  • Maximum Speed: 119 mph 191.5 kmh
  • Service Ceiling: 17,500 ft
  • Endurance: 1.5 hours
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × or 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia SPAD S.VII, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SPAD_S.VII"
  2. Bordes, Gerard. "SPAD." Mach 1, L'encyclopédie de l'Aviation, Volume 8. Paris: Atlas, 1981, pp. 2173-2187.
  3. Bruce, J.M. "The First Fighting SPADs". Air Enthusiast, Issue 26, April - July 1981. Bromley, Kent: Pilot Press, p. 59, p. 61-62. ISSN 0143-5450.
  4. Connors, John F., Don Greer and Perry Manley. "SPAD Fighters in Action" (Aircraft in Action No. 93). Carrollton, Texas: Squadron-Signal Publications, 1989. ISBN 0-89747-217-9.
  5. Crosby, Francis. "A Handbook of Fighter Aircraft". London: Hermes House, 2003. ISBN 1-84309-444-4.
  6. Sharpe, Michael. "Biplanes, Triplanes, and Seaplanes". London: Friedman/Fairfax Books, 2000, p. 270. ISBN 1-58663-300-7.
  7. "United States Air Force Museum Guidebook". Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio: Air Force Museum Foundation, 1975, p. 9.

Italian AvitionItalian Rondel

Hanriot HD.1 (Nieuport-Macchi)

Hanriot H.D.1
Hanriot H.D.1 - 1916
Hanriot H.D.1
Hanriot H.D.1 - 1917

The Hanriot HD.1 was a French World War I single seat fighter. Rejected for service with French squadrons in favor of the SPAD S.7, the type was supplied to the Belgians and the Italians with whom it proved highly successful. 831 of a total production of about 1200 were in fact produced by Italian companies under licence.

The type was also produced by the Nieuport-Macchi company of Varese, Italy, which built almost 900 HD.1s between 1917 and 1919, more than the parent firm.
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Hanriot HD.1
  • Type: Biplane fighter aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Hanriot - Nieuport-Macchi company
  • Designed by: Pierre Dupont
  • Introduced: June 1916
  • Primary users: Corpo Aeronautico Militare
  • Number built: about 1200
  • Powerplant: 1× Le Rhône 9J, 9 cylinder air cooled radial, 110 hp. (82 kW)
  • Wingspan: 25 ft 6 in (8.70 m)
  • Wing area: 193.7 ft² (18 m²)
  • Length: 19 ft 2 in (5.85 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 7.5 in (2.94 m)
  • Empty weight: 895 lb (407 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 1,331 lb (605 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 1437 lb (652 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 184 km/h (99 knots, 114 mph)
  • Range: 550 km (297 nm, 342 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 6,400 m (21,000 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 5.1 mins to 2,000 m (7,600 ft); 11 mins to 3,000 m (9,840 ft)
  • Crew: one, pilot
  • Armament: 1 × or 2 × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Hanriot HD.1, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hanriot_HD.1"
  2. Cheesman E.F. (ed.) "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War" Letchworth, Harletford Publications, 1960 pp. 82-83
  3. Holmes, Tony (2005). "Jane's Vintage Aircraft Recognition Guide". London: Harper Collins. p 31. ISBN 0 0071 9292 4.

Russia AviationRussian Rondel

Mosca MB 2bis

Mosca MB 2bis 1916
Mosca MB 2bis - 1916

The Mosca MB 2bis is a smaller version of MB. It was fitted with a more powerful engine, and armed with single machinegun. One feature of the MB bis 2 was a folding wing that functioned in the same way as on its predecessor. The Mosca MB 2bis performed well in combat, despite the fact it was not equipped with synchronizer gear. On some Mosca MB-bis the gun was installed to fire above propeller arc.On other variants the propeller blades were protected by bullet-reflectors similar to the ones used on the Morane Saulnier N.

[Read more]

Mosca MB 2bis
  • Type: Fighter
  • National Origin: Russia
  • Entered Service: 1916
  • Primary User: Imperial Russian Air Service
  • Powerplant: 1× Rhône air-cooled rotary 80 hp (60 kW)
  • Wingspan: (7.2 m)
  • Length: (6.1 m)
  • Empty Weight: (330 kg)
  • Gross Weight: (487 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: (130 km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: (3200 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 machinegun

Anatra-DS

Anatra-DS 1916
Anatra-DS - 1916

The Anatra D, DS, and DSS were almost identical. Most of the differences between the aircraft were in the powerplant. Radiators were installed on the sides of the Plywood covered fuselage or under the nose section. The Anatra-DS was first flown on July 25, 1916, the "Anasal" entered mass production in 1917. There were 60 to 70 of these planes built, and in service during 1917.

Anatra-DS
  • Type: reconnaissance
  • National Origin: Russia
  • Manufacturer: Anatra Factories
  • Entered Service: 1916
  • Primary User: Imperial Russian Air Service
  • Powerplant: 1 ×Salmson Canton-Unne water cooled radial 150hp
  • Length: (8.1m)
  • Wingspan: (11.4m)
  • Empty Weight: (814kg)
  • Speed: 144km/h (150km/h)
  • Service Ceiling: (4300m)
  • Endurance: 3.5 hr
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 2 × machineguns

References

  1. "The Imperial Russian Air Service" Flying Machine Press, pp.338-344, p 488-491
  2. "Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One" Flying Machine Press, p. 454
  3. Windsock Volume 2, No. 4, Winter, 1986, p. 19-21.

Austrian AviationAustrian Cross

Hansa-Brandenburg C.I

Hansa-Brandenburg C.I - 1916
Hansa-Brandenburg C.I - 1916
Hansa-Brandenburg C.I - 1916
Hansa-Brandenburg C.I - 1916

The Hansa-Brandenburg C.I was a 2-seater armed single-engine reconnaissance biplane The C.I had several similarities with the earlier B.I, including inward-sloping interplane bracing struts. Like other early-war Austro-Hungarian reconnaissance aircraft, such as C-types of Lloyd or Lohner, the Hansa-Brandenburg C.I had a communal cockpit for its crew. Both the Hansa-Brandenburg C.I and B.I were designed by Ernst Heinkel, who worked at that time for Hansa-Brandenburg in Germany.
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Hansa-Brandenburg C.I
  • Type: Reconnaissance aircraft
  • National Origin: Austria-Hungary
  • Manufacturer: Hansa-Brandenburg
  • Designed by : Ernst Heinkel
  • Entered Service: 1916
  • Number Built: 1318
  • Primary User: KuKLFT
  • Powerplant: 1 × Austro-Daimler water-cooled in-line, 160 hp (120 kW)
  • Wingspan: 43 ft 03/8 in (13.12 m)
  • Wing area: 468 ft² (43.46 m²)
  • Length: 26 ft 10¾ in (8.20 m)
  • Loaded weight: 2,332 lb (1,060 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 78 mph (125 km/h) at sea level
  • Service ceiling: 19,000 ft (5,800 m)
  • Wing loading: (kg/m²)
  • Endurance: 3 hours
  • Crew: 2, pilot and observer
  • Armament:
    • Guns: 1 or 2 × 0.315 in (8 mm) Schwarzlose machine gun(s)
    • Bombs: Up to 100 kg (220 lb) of bombs

References

  1. Hansa-Brandenburg C.I. (2010, May 4). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 03:35, July 2, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hansa-Brandenburg_C.I&oldid=360036356
  2. Munson, Kenneth - "Bombers, Patrol and Reconnaissance Aircraft 1914 - 1919" ISBN 0 7537 0918 X

Hansa-Brandenburg D.I (Type KD)

Hansa-Brandenburg D.I (Type KD)
Hansa-Brandenburg D.I - 1916

The Hansa Brandenburg D-I was a German fighter aircraft of World War I. It was built for Austria-Hungary, some aircraft serving to the end of the war. The D-I was a single seat, single engined biplane, of wooden construction, with plywood fuselage skinning and fabric wing skins. The wings featured an unusual “Star-Strutter” arrangement of interplane struts, where four Vee struts joined in the center of the wing bay to result in a complicated "star" arrangement. The interplane struts themselves were fabricatd from steel tubes.

The Hansa Brandenburg D-I was a very unusual looking aircraft, it had a deep fuselage, which combined with the wing configuration and large engine compartment gave a poor forward view for the pilot and tended to blanket the undersized rudder, giving poor lateral stability and making recovery from spins extremely difficult.

Hansa-Brandenburg D.I
  • Type: Fighter
  • National Origin: Austria-Hungary
  • Manufacturer:
    • Hansa-Brandenburg
    • Phonix Flugzeug-Werke AG
    • Ungarische Flugzeugfabrik
  • Entered Service: Autumn 1916
  • Primary User: KuKLFT
  • Number Built:122
  • Powerplant: 1× Austro-Daimler 6-cylinder air cooled in-line, 185 hp (138 kW)
  • Wingspan: 27 ft 10 2/3 in (8.50 m)
  • Length: 20 ft 10 in (6.35 m)
  • Height: 9.15ft (2.79m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,481 lb (672 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 2,028 lb (920 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 116 mph (187 km/h)
  • Max Range: 162 miles (260km)
  • Rate of Climb: 1,000ft/min (305m/min)
  • Service Ceiling: 16,400 ft (5,000 m)
  • Endurance: 2 hours 30 minutes
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1× 0.315 in (8 mm) Schwarzlose machine gun

References

  1. Hansa-Brandenburg D.I. (2009, December 19). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 03:06, July 2, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hansa-Brandenburg_D.I&oldid=332619883
  2. Angelucci, Enzo (ed.). "World Encyclopedia of Military Aircraft. London: Jane's, 1981, p. 43, p.54. ISBN 0 7106 0148 4.
  3. Gray, Peter and Thetford, Owen. "German Aircraft of the First World War". London: Putnam, 1962, p.64.
  4. Green, William and Swanborough, Gordon. The Complete Book of Fighters". New York: Smithmark, 1994, p.83. ISBN 0-8317-3939-8.
  5. Hooton, E.R. Phoenix Triumphant: "The Rise and Rise of the Luftwaffe". London: Arms & Armour Press, 1994, p.25-26. ISBN 1 85409 181 6.
  6. Williams, Anthony G. and Gustin, Emmanuel. "Flying Guns World War I". Ramsbury, Wiltshire: Airlife, 2003, p.62. ISBN 1 84037 396 2.

German AviationGerman Cross

Albatros D.III

 Albatros D.III - 1916
Albatros D.III - 1916
 Albatros D.V - 1917
Albatros D.III (OAW) - 1916

The Albatros D.III was a biplane fighter aircraft used by the Imperial German Army Air Service (Luftstreitkräfte) and the Austro-Hungarian Air Service (Luftfahrtruppen) during World War I. The D.III was flown by many top German aces, including Manfred von Richthofen, Ernst Udet, Erich Löwenhardt, Kurt Wolff, and Karl Emil Schäfer. It was the preeminent fighter during the period of German aerial dominance known as "Bloody April" 1917.
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Albatros D.III
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Albatros-Flugzeugwerke
  • Designed by: Robert Thelen
  • First Flight : August 1916
  • Number Built: approximately 1866
  • Powerplant: 1× Mercedes D.IIIa inline water cooled engine, 170 hp (127 kW)
  • Wingspan: 29 ft 6 in (9.00 m)
  • Length: 24 ft 0 in (7.33 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 6 in (2.90 m)
  • Wing Area: 254 ft² (23.6 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 1,532 lb (695 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 1,949 lb (886 kg)
  • Max Takeoff Weight: 2,105 lb (955 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 94 kn, 109 mph (175 km/h) at sea level
  • Service Ceiling: 18,044 ft (5,500 m)
  • Rate of Climb: 886ft/min (4.5 m/s)
  • Wing Loading: 7.67 lb/ft² (37.5 kg/m²)
  • Power/Mass: 0.081 hp/lb (0.13 kW/kg)
  • Range: 261 nmi, 300 mi (480 km)
  • Endurance: 2 hours
  • Crew: one
  • Armament: 2 × 7.92 mm (.312 in) LMG 08/15 machine guns

Fokker D.IV

Fokker D.IV - 1916
Fokker D.IV - 1916

The Fokker D.IV was a German fighter biplane of World War I, this was the last variant in the development of the D.I. In the quest for improved performance it was fitted with the more powerful Mercedes D.III inline six-cylinder water-cooled engine, generating 160 hp (120 kW). The aircraft was fitted with twin fixed, forward-firing synchronised 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 "Spandau" machine guns. The upper wing was raised and the wing struts were strengthed by bracings configured in an N-pattern.

The aircraft was purchased in small numbers (40) by the German Army and the Swedes bought 4. The D.IV production life did not last long. It was soon superceded by newer and better designs. This type was soon overshadowed in 1917 by the higher performance D.VI and the iconic Fokker Dr.I triplane.

Fokker D.IV
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Albatros Flugzeugwerke
  • Designed by: Martin Kreutzer
  • Entered Service: 1916
  • Number Built: 44
  • Primary User: Luftstreitkräfte
  • Powerplant: 1 × Mercedes D.III inline six-cylinder water-cooled engine, 160 hp (120 kW)
  • Wingspan: 31 ft 10 in (9.70 m)
  • Wing Area: 226 ft² (21.0 m²)
  • Length: 21 ft 0 in (6.30 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 0 in (2.75 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1,336 lb (606 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,852 lb (840 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 100 mph (160 km/h)
  • Rate of Climb: 1,100; 20 minutes to 13,100 Ft. ft/min (5.6 m/s)
  • Range: 137 miles (220 km)
  • Crew: one pilot
  • Armament: 2 × fixed, forward-firing synchronised 0.312 in (7.92 mm) LMG 08/15 "Spandau" machine guns

References

  1. From Wikipedia Fokker D.IV, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fokker_D.IV"
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions. pp. 399.
  3. "World Aircraft Information Files". London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 894 Sheet 40-41.
  4. Green, William; Gordon Swanborough (1994). "The Complete Book of Fighters. London": Greenwich Editions. pp. 221.
  5. Lamberton, W. M. (1960). "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Letchworth,Herts: Harleyford Publications Limited. pp. 218.

Halberstadt D.II

Halberstadt D.II - 1916
Halberstadt D.II - 1916

The Halberstadt D.II was not a particularly well received biplane fighter aircraft that served through the period of Allied air superiority in early 1916, but had begun to be replaced with the superior Albatros fighters by the autumn of that year. The Halberstadt D.II was underpowered, slow, lacking in firepower. It was unable to match the altitudes reached by other planes in the German arsenal.

If the only performance figures available for the type are accurate, the Halberstadt fighter's speed and climb were little better than the Eindecker's, and inferior to such Allied contemporaries as the Nieuport 11 and the D.H.2, but it earned the respect of Allied fighter pilots, and was the preferred mount of the pilots of the early Jagdstaffeln, until the Albatros D.I became available.
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Halberstadt D.II
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Halberstädter Flugzeugwerke
  • Designed by: Karl Theis
  • First flight: Late 1915
  • Introduced: Early 1916
  • Retired: 1917
  • Number Built: 85
  • Powerplant: 1× Mercedes D.II six cylinder in-line, 120 hp (90 kW)
  • Wingspan: 28 ft 11 in (8.8 m)
  • Length: 23 ft 11 in (7.3 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 9 in (2.67 m)
  • Wing Area: 254 ft² (23.6 m²)
  • Empty Weight: 1,144 lb (519 kg)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,606 lb (728.5 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 90 mph (145 km/h)
  • Rate of Climb: 15 min to 9,850 ft (3,000 m)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 1 × forward-firing 7.92 mm (.312 in) lMG 08 "Spandau" machine gun

References

  1. From Wikipedia Halberstadt D.II, "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halberstadt_D.II"
  2. Cheesman, E.F. (1960). "Fighter Aircraft of the 1914-1918 War". Harleyford Publications.
  3. Munson, Kenneth (1968). "Fighters, Attack and Training Aircraft 1914-1919 War". Blndford Press.
  4. Grey & Thetford (1962-70). "German Aircraft of the First World War" (2nd ed.). Putnam & Company.
  5. Grosz, Peter M. (1996). "Halberstadt Fighters-Classics of World War I Aviation". Albatros Publications.

Roland D.II

LFG Roland D.II
LFG Roland D.II - 1916

The D.II was a single-seat escort fighter, based on the structural principles of the C II, a wooden veneer shell fuselage. The deep fuselage filled to gap between the biplane wings completely. The production was hampered by a fire in the L.F.G. factory; about 20 were built. The Roland D.II suffered from a design flaw that limited the forward view of the pilot.

Roland D.II
  • Type: Fighter
  • Manufacturer: Luft-Fahrzeug-Gesellschaft G.m.b.H.
  • Number Built: approximately 20
  • Entered Service: 1916
  • Powerplant: 1× Mercedes D.III, water cooled 6 cylinder in-line,160 hp (120 kW)
  • Wingspan: 8.94 m
  • Length: 6.93 m
  • Empty Weight: 653 kg
  • Loaded Weight: 793 kg
  • Maximum Speed: 169 km/h
  • Service Ceiling: 5200 m
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: 2 × forward firing Spandau 7.92mm machine guns