Blériot XI - 1914
The Blériot XI, proved to be a superior flying machine.

The First Over the English Channel

On July 25, 1909, the Frenchman Louis Bleriot, in an aircraft he designed and built, became the first to fly across the English Channel. For this great feat he was awarded a prize of 1,000 pounds by the London Daily Mail.

Even though Louis had been deathly sick with an infected foot (the result of a gasoline explosion), he was forced into making the flight when he did. He had been on crutches for a week, but a few days earlier another Frenchman, Hubert Latham, had attempted the flight but had been forced into the channel after seven miles due to a faulty motor. He was rescued by a French naval vessel ordered to follow his course as a safety measure.

Louis knew that Hubert would try again, and soon. Therefore at four o'clock in the morning, Louis Blériotstepped into his monoplane and flew from Les Barrages, France, to Dover, England.

The Blériot XI, Louis's plane, proved to be a superior flying machine and distinguished itself in many events preceding the war. Conquering the Alps was among many of its numerous accomplishments.

Farman Biplane
Farman Biplane

Designed by French aviator Henri Farman and based upon similar aircraft produced by the Voisin brothers of France the Farman Biplane received popular acceptance by early aviators. Farman Biplanes went on to be employed in the early stages of WWI by the French military.

Dufaux-5
Dufaux-5

The Dufaux 4 was an experimental aircraft built in Switzerland in 1909 and which was originally constructed as an un-named biplane, the third aircraft constructed by the brothers Armand and Henri Dufaux. The aircraft was entirely conventional for the era - a two-bay biplane with unstaggered wings of equal span and a triangular-section fuselage. Construction began in mid-September 1909 and work proceeded rapidly, as the brothers hoped to claim a CHF 1,000 prize put up by the Automobile Club de Suisse for the first Swiss-built aircraft to fly a 1 km closed-circuit.

The French School

Once the aeroplane made its debut with the Morane-Saulnier and the Blériot XI, flying schools began popping up all over Western Europe where young pilots-to-be could learn to fly these new machines. One of the most popular shools was the French School.

At the French School, the pilot-in-training would sit down in his plane and start the engine while the instructor quickly pointed out all of the instuments and some hints and tips, yelling over the roar of the engine. The instuctor would leap off the plane and the student would open up the throttle a little and taxi around the field trying to get a feel for the controls. At a signal from his intructor, the student would open the throttle a little more and go bounding through the grass, and some of the more daring students would even leave the ground for a few seconds, though this was supposed to be saved for the second day.

Gradually the student would progress, staying airborn for longer and longer amounts of time and going higher and higher into the atmoshpere. As the pilot flew higher into the sky above the clouds, strange happenings occured. The early flyers had no comprehension of air currents. Air pockets caused by changes in temperature in the atmoshpere (strong winds) could sieze the plane suddenly and carry it, and the pilot could do nothing with the ailerons or the engine.

In the middle of the Salisbury Plain training area there was a narrow, wooded cleft several miles from the Upavon Aerodrome known as the valley of death. Between 1909 and 1913 seven planes plummeted to their deaths their, seized on fine summer evenings by the wood's strange spiralling air currents and smashed to pices in the treetops. The place can still be visited today, unchanged since those times and curiously redolent of its victims' aura.

The following passage was written by an American student of the French School regarding the first day's training:

“When a student was first learning to crow-hop up and down a field, he'd take off, rise about ten or twenty feet and then bring the ship down almost flat, hardly peaking at all, by blipping the motor on and off. About four or five feet off the ground, the amateur eagle just let her drop ker-wham. The sound was the general effect of an earthquake in a hardware store, but the miracle was that the ship seemed to suffer no particular ill effects. A tire here or a couple of wires there would go, or perhaps a shock-absorber cord, but nothing happened to render the ship unfit for further use.”

Avro Type D

Avro Type D - 1911
Avro Type D - 1911

The Type D was a two-bay biplane of conventional configuration, with equal-span, unstaggered wings. The fuselage was triangular in cross-section, and lateral control was provided by wing warping. The first of seven aircraft flew at Brooklands on 1 April 1911.

The Type Ds were used in a variety of roles by the Avro, mostly concerned with exploring the limits of what an aeroplane could do. In its first few weeks of existence, the prototype was used to make a number of attempts on aerial endurance records, as well as demonstrations for the Parliamentary Aerial Defence Committee.
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Avro Type D
  • Role: Experimental aircraft
  • National Origin: Britian
  • Manufacturer: A.V. Roe and Company
  • Designed by: Alliott Verdon Roe
  • First flight: 1 April 1911
  • Retired: 1914
  • Number built: 7
  • Powerplant: 1 × 4-cylinder Green C.4 inline piston, 35 hp (26 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 31 ft 0 in (9.45 m)
  • Length: 28 ft 0 in (8.53 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 2 in (2.79 m)
  • Wing area: 310 ft² (28.8 m²)
  • Gross weight: 500 lb (227 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 49 mph (78 km/h)
  • Crew: one pilot
  • Capacity: 1 passenger
  • Armament: None

References

  1. Avro Type D. (2010, May 4). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 01:52, December 14, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Avro_Type_D&oldid=360032443
  2. Avro Type D 1911 Virtual Aircraft Museum Retrieved 01:50, December 14, 2010, from http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/avro_d.php
  3. Sharpe, Michael. Biplanes, Triplanes, and Seaplanes, pg.56. London, England: Friedman/Fairfax Books , 2000. ISBN 1-58663-300-7.
  4. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. pp. 91.
  5. World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 889 Sheet 92.
  6. britishaircraft.co.uk

Avro 500

Avro Type E - 1912
Avro Type E - 1912
Avro 500 - 1912
Avro 500 - 1912

The Avro Type E, Type 500, and Type 502 made up a family of early British military aircraft, regarded by Alliott Verdon Roe as his firm's first truly successful design.
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Avro 500
  • Role: Military utility aircraft
  • National Origin: Britian
  • Manufacturer: A.V. Roe and Company
  • First flight: 3 March 1912
  • Operators:
    • United Kingdom:
    • Royal Naval Air Service
    • Royal Flying Corps
  • Number built: 18
  • Powerplant: 1 × Gnome rotary, 50 hp (37 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 36 ft 0 in (10.97 m)
  • Wing area: 330 ft² (30.7 m²)
  • Length: 29 ft 0 in (8.84 m)
  • Height: 9 ft 9 in (2.97 m)
  • Empty weight: 900 lb (408 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1,360 lb (617 kg)
  • Crew: one pilot
  • Capacity: 1 seat for observer, instructor, or passenger
  • Maximum speed: 61 mph (98 km/h)
  • Endurance: 2 hours 30 min
  • Rate of climb: 440 ft/min (2.2 m/s)

References

  1. Avro 500. (2010, May 4). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 07:27, December 9, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Avro_500&oldid=360032279
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. (1989). London: Studio Editions. pp. 91.
  3. World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 889 Sheet 92.

Avro 501

Avro 501 - 1913
Avro 501

The Avro Type H, Type 501, and Type 503 were a family of early British military seaplanes. They were a development of the Avro 500 design and were originally conceived of as amphibious; the prototype being fitted with a single large main float (equipped with wheels) under the fuselage, and two outrigger floats under the wings. Tests were conducted on Lake Windermere in January 1913. It was later converted to twin-float configuration and bought by the British Admiralty. It now, however, proved too heavy and was converted again - this time to a landplane.
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AVRO 501
  • Role: Military Utility Seaplane
  • National Origin: United Kingdom
  • Manufacturer: Avro
  • First flight: January 1913
  • Number built: 5
  • Operators:
    • German Empire
    • United Kingdom
    • Turkey
  • Powerplant: 1 × Gnome rotary, 100 hp (75 kW) each
  • Wingspan: 47 ft 6 in (14.48 m)
  • Wing area: 478 ft² (44.4 m²)
  • Length: 33 ft 0 in (10.06 m)
  • Height: 12 ft 6 in (3.81 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,740 lb (789 kg)
  • Gross weight: 2,700 lb (1,225 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 55 mph (89 km/h)
  • Crew: one pilot
  • Capacity: 1 observer or passenger

References

  1. "Avro 501". (2011, January 22). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 04:57, January 31, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Avro_501&oldid=409396299
  2. Jackson, A.J. (1990)." Avro Aircraft since 1908" (Second ed.), p. 51. London: Putnam. ISBN 0 -85177-834-8.
  3. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions. pp. 91.
  4. "World Aircraft Information Files". London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 889 Sheet 93.

Avro Type F

Avro Type F - 1912
Avro Type F - 1912

The Avro Type F was an early single seat British aircraft from Avro and the first aircraft in the world to feature a completely enclosed cabin.

It was a wire-braced mid-wing monoplane of conventional configuration with a tailskid undercarriage. The fuselage itself was teardrop-shaped with flat sides and "glazed" with celluloid windows around the cabin. Two circular windows at the pilot's head level could be opened for the pilot's head to protrude when flying under poor visibility. Ingress and egress was via a trapdoor in the fuselage top. The cabin was quite cramped - at its widest point only 2 ft (60 cm) across.
[Read more]

Avro Type F
  • Role: Experimental aircraft
  • National Origin: Britian
  • Manufacturer: A.V.Roe and Company
  • First flight: 1 May 1912
  • Number built: 1
  • Powerplant: 1 × Viale 35 hp 5-cylinder radial, 35 hp (26 kW)
  • Wingspan: 29 ft 0 in (8.84 m)
  • Length: 23 ft 0 in (7.01 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 6 in (2.29 m)
  • Wing area: 158 ft² (14.7 m²)
  • Empty weight: 550 lb (250 kg)
  • Gross weight: 800 lb (360 kg)
  • Maximum speed: 65 mph (105 km/h)
  • Rate of climb: 300 ft/min (1.5 m/s)
  • Crew: one pilot

References

  1. Avro Type F. (2010, May 4). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 02:17, December 14, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Avro_Type_F&oldid=360032450
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. pp. 91.
  3. World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 889 Sheet 92-93.
  4. britishaircraft.co.uk

Breguet Type III

Breguet Type III

The Breguet Types III, IV, and V were a family of early biplanes built by Louis Breguet in France from 1910-1912.

Design and development

They built on the basic pattern established in the design of the Type II, unorthodox biplanes with conical fuselages (that earned them the nickname "coffee pots" in France and "tin whistles" in England), cruciform tails, and tricycle undercarriage, but were somewhat larger and sturdier. A Type IV achieved fame in August 1910 as being the first aircraft to lift six people. This family also included the first machines that Breguet was able to sell to the French military, after arranging a series of demonstrations for the Army. In 1911, a Type III named Breguet du Maroc became the first heavier-than-air aircraft to fly in the French colonies, with Henri Brégi making a flight from Casablanca to Fes.

Operators

  • France: French Air Force operated 32 aircraft of Type G3, plus some Type A-G4s.
  • Italy: Italian Air Force operated 3 aircraft of Type G3, plus some Type A-G4s.
  • Sweden: Swedish Air Force operated 1 aircraft of Type G3.
  • United Kingdom: Royal Flying Corps operated 5 aircraft of Type G3, plus some Type A-G4s.
  • No. 2 Squadron RFC
  • No. 4 Squadron RFC
  • Royal Naval Air Service operated 15 A-G4 aircraft.
Breguet Types III, IV, and IV
  • Type: Experimental aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Breguet
  • Designed by: Louis Breguet
  • First flight: 1910
  • Primary users:
    • French Air Force
    • Royal Naval Air Service
    • Royal Flying Corps
    • Italian Air Force
  • Powerplant: 1 × Canton-Unné radial, 85 hp (63 kW)
  • Wingspan: 44 ft 11 in (13.70 m)
  • Length: 30 ft (9.15 m)
  • Empty weight: 1,550 lb (703 kg)
  • Gross weight: 2,535 lb (1,150 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 50 mph (80 km/h)
  • Crew: 3, 1 × pilot, 2 × passengers
  • Variants:
    • Type III:
    • Type IV:
    • Type V:
    • Type G2: Powered by the Gnome et Rhône engine.
    • Type G2-bis: Powered by the Gnome et Rhône engine.
    • Type G3: Major production version powered by the Gnome et Rhône 100 hp (75 kW) engine, 41 sold to various military operators in 1912.
    • Type A-G4: Definitive military version of 1913, powered by the Gnome et Rhône engine.
    • Type U1: Powered by the Canton-Unné engine, sometimes called C-U1.
    • Type U2: Powered by the Canton-Unné engine, sometimes called C-U2.
    • Type H-U2 (H for Hydro): Seaplane version of the Type U2.
    • Type U3: Powered by the Canton-Unné engine, sometimes called C-U3.
    • Type H-U3: Seaplane version of the Type U3.

References

  1. Breguet Type III. (2010, October 12). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 02:14, December 14, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Breguet_Type_III&oldid=390328002
  2. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. pp. 196, 197.
  3. World Aircraft Information Files. London: Bright Star Publishing. pp. File 890 Sheet 78.
  4. Hartmann, Gérard. Les premiers appareils Breguet.

Morane-Saulnier H

Morane-Saulnier H - 1913
Morane-Saulnier H

The Morane-Saulnier H was a sport aircraft produced in France in the years before the First World War, a single-seat derivative of the successful Morane-Saulnier G with a slightly reduced wingspan Like the Type G, it was a successful sporting type in its day.

During the second international aero meet, held at Wiener Neustadt in June 1913, Roland Garros won the precision landing prize in a Type H.

The French Army ordered a batch of 26 aircraft, and the British Royal Flying Corps also acquired a small number, these latter machines purchased from Grahame-White, who was manufacturing the type in the UK under licence. The French machines saw limited service in the opening stages of World War I, with pilots engaging in aerial combat using revolvers and carbines.

The type was also produced under licence in Germany by Pfalz Flugzeugwerke, who built it as the E.I, E.II, E.IV, E.V, and E.VI, with increasingly powerful engines. These were armed with a single, synchronised LMG 08/15 machine gun.

Morane-Saulnier H
  • Type: Sport aircraft
  • Manufacturer: Morane-Saulnier
  • First flight: 1913
  • Operators:
  • Variants
    • Pfalz-built versions
    • E.I - with Oberursel U.0 rotary engine (60 built)
    • E.II - with Oberursel U.I rotary engine
    • E.IV - with Oberursel U.III rotary engine (ca. 24 built)
    • E.V - with Mercedes D.I water-cooled, inline engine
    • E.VI - with Oberursel U.I engine, lengthened fuselage, enlarged tail fin and additional bracing (20 built)
  • France: Aéronautique Militaire
  • Austria-Hungary: Austro-Hungarian Navy - (Pfalz-built versions)
  • Germany: Luftstreitkräfte - (Pfalz-built versions)
  • Portugal: One aircraft only.
  • United Kingdom: Royal Flying Corps
  • Length: 5.84 m (19 ft 2 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.12 m (29 ft 11 in)
  • Height: 2.26 m (7 ft 5 in)
  • Empty weight: 188 kg (415 lb)
  • Gross weight: 444 kg (979 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Le Rhône 9C, 60 kW (80 hp)
  • Maximum speed: 120 km/h (75 mph)
  • Range: 177 km (111 miles)
  • Crew: One pilot

References

  1. "Morane-Saulnier H". (2010, September 18). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 19:55, September 24, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Morane-Saulnier_H&oldid=385618616
  2. "Schneider et hydravions anciens/Dossiers historiques hydravions et moteurs". http://www.hydroretro.net/etudegh/moranesaulnierhydro.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-07.
  3. "Morane-Saulnier Type H". flugzeuginfo.net. http://www.flugzeuginfo.net/acdata_php/acdata_morane_h_en.php. Retrieved 2008-11-07.
  4. Grosz, P.M. (1996). "Pfalz E.I-E.VI". Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire: Albatros Publications.
  5. Hartmann, Gérard (2001). "L'incroyable Morane-Saulnier hydro". La Coupe
  6. "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft". London: Aerospace Publishing.
  7. Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). "Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation". London: Studio Editions.

Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.1

RAF SE.1 - 1911
Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.1 - 1911

The S.E.1 (Santos Experimental) was an experimental aircraft built at the Army Balloon Factory at Farnborough (later the Royal Aircraft Factory) in 1911. Its place in aviation history is mainly that it was the first in the series of Royal Aircraft Factory designs - several of which played an important role in World War I.

In 1911 the Army Balloon Factory was not actually authorised to construct aircraft, but only to repair them. When the remains of a crashed Blériot XI monoplane belonging to the army were sent from Larkhill to Farnborough for repair, authorisation for a complete reconstruction was sought, and granted.
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Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.1
  • Role: Experimental research aircraft
  • National Origin:Britian
  • Manufacturer: Army Balloon Factory
  • Designed by: Geoffrey de Havilland, F.M. Green
  • First flight: 11 June 1911
  • Number built: 1
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1 × E.N.V. "F", 60 hp (45 kW)
  • Wingspan: 37 ft 6 in (11.43 m)
  • Wing Area: 400 ft² (37.16 m²)
  • Height: 11 ft 6 in (3.51 m)
  • Length: 29 ft (8.84 m)
  • Loaded Weight: 1,200 lb. (544.31 Kg)
  • Crew: 1
  • Armament: None
  • No performance figures available It is unlikely sufficient testing was carried out for realistic figures to be established.

References

  1. Royal Aircraft Factory S.E.1. (2010, May 22). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 05:35, January 12, 2011, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Royal_Aircraft_Factory_S.E.1&oldid=363588932
  2. Jackson, A.J. (1978). de Havilland Aircraft since 1909 1978, pp. 38-9. London: Putnam Publishing. ISBN 0 370 30022 X.
  3. Jarrett, Philip (2002). "Making Flying Safer". In Jarrett, Philip. Pioneer Aircraft:Early Aviation before 1914 2002. London: Putnam. pp. 202-215. ISBN 0 85177 869 0.
  4. Lewis, Peter British Aircraft 1809-191, 1962. 4 London, Putnam

Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.1

RAF BE.1 - 1911
RAF BE.1 - 1911

The Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.1 was the first tractor biplane to be designed by Geoffrey de Havilland, and was the immediate predecessor of the B.E.2 and its variants, the mainstay of the early R.F.C.

In 1911 the newly renamed His Majesty's Aircraft Factory didn't have permission to design new aircraft. Its supervisor, Mervyn O'Gorman, got around this restriction by disguising new aircraft as repaired versions of older aircraft, first with the S.E.1, which was officially a slightly modified version of a damaged Blériot.
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Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.1
  • Type: scout
  • National Origin: Britian
  • Manufacturer: Royal Aircraft Factory
  • First Flight: December 4, 1911
  • Entered Service: March 11, 1912
  • Designed By: Geoffrey de Havilland
  • Powerplant: 1 × Wolseley V-8 60hp
  • Wing span: 38ft 7.5in upper, 34ft 11.5in lower
  • Length: 29ft 6.5in
  • Height: 10ft 2in
  • Maximum Speed: 59mph at sea level
  • Minimum Speed: 42mph
  • Climb rate: 155ft/min to 600ft
  • Crew: 2

References

  1. Rickard, J (3 April 2009), Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.1 , http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/weapons_RAF_BE1.html
  2. Royal Aircraft Factory B.E.1 1911 The Virtual Aircraft Museum http://www.aviastar.org/air/england/raf_be-1.php

Vickers E.F.B.1

Vickers E.B.1 - 1913
Vickers E.B.1 - 1913

Vickers received a contract from the Admiralty on November 19, 1912 for an experimental fighting biplane armed with a machine gun. Vickers investigated various configurations before deciding on placing the gunner in the extreme nose of the aircraft, in order to achieve a clear field of fire and avoid the still unsolved problem of firing a machiegun through the propeller's arc. Designated E.F.B. or Experimental Fighting Biplane 1 the aircraft was also known as the "Destroyer". Even though the prototype was unsuccessful; the Vickers E.F.B.1 was, if not the first, then one of the earliest dedicated fighter aircraft ever built.
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Vickers E.F.B.1
  • Type: Experimental Fighter
  • National Origin: Britian
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Ltd (Aviation Department)
  • First Flight: Early 1913
  • Number Built: 1
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: Wolseley V-eight-cylinder engine 80 hp (60 kW)
  • Wingspan: 40 ft 0 in (12.19 m)
  • Wing Area: 385.02ft² (35.77 m²)
  • Length: 28 ft 6 in (8.38 m)
  • Height: 12 ft 11 in (3.63 m)
  • Empty Weight: 1759 lb (798 kg)
  • Take-off Weight: 2661 lb (1207 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 70 mph (113 km/h)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 1× forward-firing 0.303 in (7.7mm) Maxim machine gun

Vickers E.F.B.2

Vickers E.B.2 - 1913
Vickers E.F.B.2

Following the loss of the E.F.B.1, Vickers undertook major redesign of its gun carrier while retaining the basic configuration to result in the E.F.B.2, again against an Admiralty contract. The E.F.B.2 eliminated the wing stagger of the previous aircraft and increased the span of the lower wing while retaining warping for lateral control. The fuselage nacelle was redesigned and large celluloid windows were inserted in its sides; the angular horizontal tail surfaces gave place to surfaces of elliptical form and a 100hp Gnome Monosoupape nine-cylinder rotary engine was fitted. The 7.7mm machine gun on a ball-and-socket mounting in the forward cockpit was retained, and the E.F.B.2 entered flight test at Bognor in the autumn of 1913, but crashed there during the course of October.

Vickers E.F.B.2
  • Type: Experimental Fighter
  • National Origin: Britian
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Ltd (Aviation Department)
  • First Flight: Autumn 1913
  • Number Built: 1
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1× Gnome Monosoupape air cooled 9-cylinder rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 39 ft 7 in (11.76 m)
  • Wing area: 379.97 sq ft (35.30 m2)
  • Length: 29 ft 2 in (8.89 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 7 in (2.92 m)
  • Take-off Weight: 1759 lb (798 kg)
  • Empty Weight: 1049 lb (476 kg)
  • Maximum Speed: 60 mph (97 km/h)
  • Range: 150 miles (241 km)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 1× forward-firing 0.303 in (7.7mm) Maxim machine gun

Vickers E.F.B.3

Vickers E.B.3 - 1913
Vickers E.B.3 - 1913

In December 1913, a third Vickers Experimental Fighting Biplane, the E.F.B.3, made its debut. The slight overhang of the top wing was eliminated to result in an equi-span biplane, the fuselage nacelle underwent further redesign, the celluloid windows being eliminated, and, most important, ailerons on both upper and lower wings supplanted the wing-warping control of its predecessors. The 100hp Gnome Monosoupape rotary was retained as was also the 7.7mm Vickers gun. Displayed at the Aero Show held at Olympia in 1914, the E.F.B.3. was the subject of an order from the Admiralty for six aircraft placed in December 1913. This contract was subsequently taken over by the War Office, the six aircraft embodying a number of modifications - at least one was fitted with an eight-cylinder Vee-type 80hp Wolseley engine - and being referred to as the Vickers No (or Type) 30. These were to lead in turn to the E.F.B.5 and F.B.5 Gunbus.

Vickers E.F.B.3
  • Type: Experimental Fighter
  • National Origin: Britian
  • Manufacturer: Vickers Ltd (Aviation Department)
  • First Flight: December 1913
  • Number Built: 1
  • Status: Prototype
  • Powerplant: 1× Gnome Monosoupape air cooled 9-cylinder rotary engine, 100 hp (75 kW)
  • Wingspan: 37 ft 4 in (11.38 m)
  • Wing area: 385.02 sq ft (35.77 m2)
  • Length: 28 ft 6 in (8.38 m)
  • Height: 10 ft 9 in (2.97 m)
  • Take-off weight: 1680 lb (762 kg)
  • Empty weight: 1049 l (476 kg)b
  • Max. speed: 60 mph (97 km/h)
  • Range: 300 miles (483 km)
  • Crew: 2
  • Armament: 1× forward-firing 0.303 in (7.7mm) Maxim machine gun